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Best Dog Beaches & Vacations Part 2

Best Dog Beaches & Vacations Part 2

Summer is here! We are on the hunt for the best dog friendly beaches and vacations. Look out for our 4 part series covering the Best Dog Beaches & Vacations in the United States.

Here are some great dog-friendly beaches (Part 2 of 4):

 

A summary of the beach or location is included below, but you’ll have to go to our specific pawtivity listing or destination guide for more information.


 

Huntington Dog Beach, CA

Huntington Dog Beach is one of the most popular off leash dog beaches in Southern California. There’s 1.5 miles of beach for dogs to play in the sand and water. The dog beach is also home to several events, including Surf City Surf Dog.

Dog Leaping For Joy On The Beach
 

Montrose Dog Beach, IL

Montrose Beach Dog Beach Chicago’s first off-leash dog beach located at the northwest end of Montrose Beach on Lake Michigan. It’s huge at 4 acres, so there’s plenty of room for dogs to run free.

Beach Dog
 

Jekyll Island, GA

Jekyll Island is a beautiful and quiet ocean retreat known for its 8 miles of white sandy beaches and protected natural habitat. It’s also a very dog friendly beach destination to take your dog, even if they do have to be on leash. There’s plenty of dog friendly beaches, campgrounds, and fishing in the area to make a weekend trip with your dog!

 

Wildwood Dog Beach, CA

Wildwood Dog Beach is an enclosed, off leash dog beach famous for its 25 foot high fire hydrant sculpture. Spend a day with your dog (on leash) on the beach with your family and give him some off leash time at the dog beach between Glenwood and Maple Avenue.

 

Do you have any other recommendations for dog friendly beaches? Or suggestions on other things to do at the beaches we mentioned above?

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Related Pawtivities: Dog Park, Swimming, Beach Camping, Hiking, Biking, Running, Play Tug, Play Frisbee
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Sports-Water, Swimming, Beach, Great Outdoors, Outdoor Play, Sightseeing, Travel

Jekyll Island, GA

Jekyll Island is a beautiful and quiet ocean retreat known for its 8 miles of white sandy beaches and protected natural habitat. It’s also a very dog friendly beach destination to take your dog, even if they do have to be on leash.

On your way to Jekyll Island stop by the Jekyll Island Welcome Center to pick up a map and inquire about area events.

Dogs must be on a 16 ft or shorter leash at all times – head north of South Dunes Picnic Area. Do not let your dog interact with any protected migratory birds and turtles on the island. Dogs are not allowed on the boardwalk nor on South Beach (between South Dunes Picnic Area and 2000′ Northeast of St. Andrews Sound Picnic Area) as well as Glory Beach. Service dogs are excluded from the restriction.

Dog Friendly Things To Do:

Driftwood Beach – This dog friendly beach is located at the north end of Jekyll Island. It’s called Driftwood Beach because of all the large pieces of driftwood that wash up on white sandy shore. Dogs love exploring the area and playing on the beach. You may even spot some dolphins out towards the water.

Great Dunes Beach Park – This is a great family beach that is also dog friendly. It’s located near the middle of the island. There are showers available at this location.

St. Andrews Beach – This is another dog friendly beach accessible via the St. Andrews Picnic Area. The beach is located on the southwest side of the island and a great place to go shelling and see wildlife. If you walk all the way south, you will see a shipwreck at the very southern end of the island.

Biking – There are several biking trails that go around the island. For a bike map of the island click here. You can also refer to this map which also shows places of interest. You don’t have to bring your bike as there are plenty of bike rental shops around, however, you will still need to have your dog on a leash.

Jekyll Island Campground – This campsite is at the north side of the island. There are 158 campsites, bath houses, and bike rentals nearby. Book online at The campground is located at 1197 Riverview Dr., Jekyll Island, GA 31527. Call 912.635.3021 for more information.

Jekyll Island Fishing Center – Head over to the fishing pier at the very north side of the island if you want to go fishing or crabbing. You will need a license. The fishing center is located at 10 Clam Creek Rd, Jekyll Island, GA 31527. Call (912) 635-3556 for more information. Farther down on Clam Creek Rd is the Clam Creek Picnic Area where you can stop, explore the oak-saw palmetto forest, and grill up your daily catch. You can also hop on to a trail that will take you do Driftwood Beach.

There’s a lot more to do on Jekyll Island, but there are still many places that do not allow dogs. Learn more from the Jekyll Island official travel website and Jekyll Island Georgia website.

 


Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Jekyll Island | Georgia
Activities: Beach, Swimming, Sports – Water, Outdoor Play, Biking

Top 10 Bike Trails That Allow Dogs

Top 10 Bike Trails That Allow Dogs

Interested in going road biking or mountain biking with your dog?

Your search for the best bike trails that allow dogs is over! We give the top 10 bike trails and bike destinations for you and your dog. These trails are hand-picked as the most appropriate for dogs to run alongside your bicycle.

Top 10 Bike Trails That Allow Dogs

1. Acadia National Park, Maine
2. American River Bike Trail
3. East Bay Bike Path, Rhode Island
4. Cowboy Trail, Nebraska
5. George S. Mickelson Trail, South Dakota
6. Great Allegheny Passage Trail, Pennsylvania / Maryland
7. Katy Trail, Missouri
8. Banks-Vernonia Trail, Oregon
9. The Flume Trail & Tahoe Rim Trail, Nevada
10. Maah Daah Hey Trail, North Dakota


These are the trails that we think are the most scenic and dog-appropriate. Most of these trails are wide or flat enough for dogs to run on. There are a few challenging, but simply amazing trails for dogs on the list. Off the list are paths that share the road with vehicles and other areas that may be too dangerous for dogs.

Many of these trails are actually rails-to-trails routes, connecting several old railroad routes together into a great bike path for many to enjoy today. If you are on a rails-to-trails route, you’ll likely see a lot of history, wooden bridges and old relics along your journey.

Save this article (click on the paw to save to your saved articles – members only)! We will expand this list and revise periodically.

New to biking with your dog? Be sure to check out some of our other articles to help you get started!

Biking Accessories For Dogs Read This
How to Bike With Your Dog Read This
How To Train Your Dog To Run With You Read This
Running With Your Dog Read This

Search for a Local Trail – Use our homepage banner to search for more biking trails in your area.

Related Pawtivities / Events: Biking, Running


TOP 10 DOG FRIENDLY BIKE TRAILS

 

1 Acadia National Park, Maine

Acadia National Park is consistently rated as one of the top parks in the nation. Biking trails are well maintained and most are either gravel or paved roads. The Carriage Roads are the most popular place to bike with your dog. It’s the best place to go with your family or just to enjoy the day with your dog. The views and scenery in this park are absolutely majestic.

Hiking - Acadia National Park, Maine
 

2 American River Bike Trail, California

The American River Bike Trail (Jediediah Smith Memorial Trail) is a paved 32 mile-long road running from Old Sacramento to Folsom. Much of the trail is shady with abundant trees and wildflowers making it a prime spot for summer biking with your dog.

 

3 East By Bike Path, Rhode Island

Want a nice, relaxing ride? The East Bay Bike Path is a paved 13.8 mile-long road starting in Independence Park in Bristol, RI and India Point Park in Providence, RI. The road travels through the city and residential neighborhoods but meanders for the most part along the Providence River.

 

4 Cowboy Trail, Nebraska

The Cowboy Trail is the longest, multi-purpose rails-to-trails at 321 miles starting in Norfolk to Chadron, Nebraska. Many use the trail between Norfolk and Valentine. Take a step back in time. You’ll see a lot of prairie flowers, sunflowers in the late summer, farms, and wooden bridges.

 

5 George S. Mickelson Trail, South Dakota

Take a step back in time to the days of Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane by starting your bike ride in Deadwood, South Dakota where the George S. Mickelson Trail starts. The trail extends 109 through the Black Hills to Edgemont, South Dakota. Travel through prairies, pine and ponderosa forests and stop to play in the water along the trail with your dog.

 

6 Great Allegheny Passage Trail, Pennsylvania / Maryland

The Great Allegheny Passage Trail (GAP Trail) is the longest rails-to-trails east of the Mississipi River at over 150 miles through Pennsylvania and Maryland. The trail is open year-round and connects to the Chesapeake & Ohio Canal Towpath Trail that goes all the way to Washington DC as well as the Montour Trail. There are plenty of campgrounds and other activities to do along the route.

 

7 Katy Trail, Missouri

The Katy Trail is one of the longest rails-to-trails projects at 237 miles from Clinton to Machens, Missouri going eastbound. Half of the trail overlaps with the Lewis and Clark National Historic Trail. The trail is open year-round, however, the best time to go is during the fall. This is a great, flat mountain bike path for you and your dog with easy access to food, lodgings and campgrounds.

 

8 Banks-Vernonia Trail, Oregon

The Banks-Vernonia Trail is a paved, multi-use 21 mile trail outside Portland, Oregon.Bike past lush forests of Douglas firs and cedars while crossing bridges and wooden trestles that let you take in the serene beauty of the area. Pedestrians, leashed dogs, horses and non-motorized vehicles are permitted on the trail. Camping is also available near the trail at Stub Stewart State Park and Vernonia Lake.

 

9 The Flume Trail & Tahoe Rim Trail, Nevada

Looking for some great mountain biking with your dog with great views of Lake Tahoe? Get on the Flume Trail or Tahoe Rim Trail in Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park’s Spooner Lake & backcountry area for 14-24 of great mountain biking. Some portions of the trail are steep and rocky while others are flat. The trails are a great option for the biker that wants a bit of a challenge.

 

10 Maah Daah Hey Trail, North Dakota

The Maah Daah Hey Trail is a 144 mile single-track, multi-use trail between Watford City and Medora. The trail is best for the intermediate to advanced mountain biker. There are plenty of campgrounds along the way to ride the Maah Daah Hey Trail with your dog into a biking trip. Multiple access points also let you pick sections of the trail for a day ride. The trail travels through the North Dakota badlands.

 

Do you know any other great dog friendly bike trails? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Related Pawtivity / Event: Biking, Bikejoring, Running
Activities: Biking, Running, Training

Maah Daah Hey Trail, ND

The Maah Daah Hey Trail is a 144 mile single-track, multi-use trail between Watford City and Medora. The trail is best for the intermediate to advanced mountain biker. There are plenty of campgrounds along the way to ride the Maah Daah Hey Trail with your dog into a biking trip.

Maah Daah Hey Trail Quick Links
Pawtivity Listing: Essential info and tips for dog owners. Link
Website: http://mdhta.com/
Maps & Access: http://mdhta.com/trail-guide/#trails/maah-daah-hey
Start: Burning Coal Campground – Medora, ND 46.59823, -103.445 Map
End: CCC Campground – Grassy Butte, ND 47.587370, -103.277838 Map
Terrain: Sand, Dirt, Rocks, River Crossings
Elevation: Varied with constant changes. Sections of the trail can be very difficult and steep. Chart: http://mdhta.com/trail-guide/#trails/maah-daah-hey
Dog Policy: Dogs must be leashed (6ft). Dogs are limited to certain areas within Theodore Roosevelt National Park. Info
Motor Vehicles: Not Allowed

Dogs must be leashed on the trail. When in Theodore Roosevelt National Park, bikers and dogs are not allowed on the trail. If you are at the Theodore Roosevelt National Park South Unit, take a detour at the Buffalo Gap Trail (between mile 49 and mile 62) marked by a buffalo trail marker. Alternatively, you can just start your ride at the Buffalo Gap Campground.

A great interactive map is available to visitors of the trail. There are several access points and campgrounds along the trail. Map: http://mdhta.com/trail-guide/#trails/maah-daah-hey

The Maah Daah Hey Trail starts and ends at (from south to north):

Burning Coal Vein Trailhead
Burning Coal Vein Campground
Medora, ND 58645
GPS Coordinates 46.59823, -103.445 Map

CCC Campground Trailhead
CCC Campground
Grassy Butte, ND 58634
Watford City, ND
GPS Coordinates 47.58635, -103.2786 Map

Two points of interest on the trail are China Wall between mile 128 and 129 of the trail (GPS Coordinates 47.4899, -103.4122 Map) and Devil’s Post between mile 100 and 101 of the trail (GPS Coordinates 47.2954, -103.5372 Map).

There are additional trails in the general area, including the Maah Daah Hey Trail. More Trails: http://mdhta.com/about/

If you want to do a day hike with your dog consider going on the Long X Trail (5.8 miles) starting at CCC Trailhead (GPS Coordinates 47.58635, -103.2786 Map) located at CCC Campground. This trail connects with the Maah Daah Hey Trail and will give you great views of the badlands. Another trail is the Summit trail (3.8 miles), which branches off the Maah Daah Hey Trail at Mile 142 south of CCC Campground and ends at the Summit Campground.

Interested in camping along the Maah Daah Hey Trail? Here is a list of campgrounds in the area from south to north. Some campgrounds have day use parking and direct access to the Maah Daah Hey Trail. Reservations are required at two of the campgrounds; Cottonwood Campground and Sully Creek Campground. Refer to the interactive map for links to campgrounds.

  • Burning Coal Vein – close to trail
  • Coal Creek
  • Sully Creek Campground – close to trail, reservations required. (North Dakota Parks and Recreation Department)
  • Cottonwood – reservations required.
  • Buffalo Gap
  • Wannagan – day use parking, close to trail
  • Elkhorn – close to trail
  • Magppie – day use parking, very close to trail
  • Bennett – day use parking, offers 2 other trails in the area
  • Summit
  • CCC – day use parking, direct access to trail

 

Primitive camping is also available on US Forest Service and National Park Service (permit required) lands, however, for most it’s much easier and safer with your dog to just stay at one the many campgrounds offered.

Looking for a shuttle service provider that will also haul your camping equipment? Consider Dakota Cyclery. To save on cost, you can also share a shuttle with others. Another option would be to get a non-biking friend or family member to haul your gear to the campsites you’ll be staying at.


Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Grassy Butte | Medora | North Dakota
Activities: Walking, Biking, Running, Hiking, Camping

The Flume Trail & Tahoe Rim Trail, NV

Looking for some great mountain biking with your dog? Get on the Flume Trail in Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park’s Spooner Lake & backcountry area. The Flume Trail is a 14 mile, one-way trail with some awesome views of the Lake Tahoe area. The best time to go is summer and fall. The park opens from sunrise to sunset year-round. Dogs are allowed on leash.

The Flume Trail Quick Links
Pawtivity Listing: Essential info and tips for dog owners. Link
Website: http://parks.nv.gov/parks/lake-tahoe-nevada-state-park-1
Maps & Access: http://parks.nv.gov/forms/Spooner_backcountry_map.pdf
Start: Spooner Lake – Carson City, NV 39.106158, -119.917994 Map
End: Incline Village, NV 39.234284, -119.930150 Map
Terrain: Sand, Gravel, Rocky
Elevation: About 7,000-8,000 feet Chart
Dog Policy: Dogs must be leashed (6ft). http://parks.nv.gov/parks/lake-tahoe-nevada-state-park-1
Motor Vehicles: Not Allowed

The starting point of the Flume Trail is Spooner Lake. Vehicles can enter the park at Spooner Lake for $10. Bike entry is $2. There is plenty of parking at the end of the trail as well along Tahoe Blvd. Flume Trail Mountain Bikes in Incline Village provides shuttles to the Flume Trail and Tahoe Rim Trail. The shuttle is free with a bike rental. Both Flume Trail Mountain Bikes and Tunnel Creek Station have their own parking lots.

There is a tough 4 mile climb at the start of the trail that goes up 1000 feet. You may opt to just walk the first few miles with your dog, rest and continue on your way. Stop by Marlette Lake to cool down and rest with your dog before continuing on for a relatively flat ride.

There are some steep cliffsides and narrow single-track trails along the route, so you will need to be able to control your dog by voice command, especially if they are off leash. Always pay attention to your surroundings and watch for other bikers, hikers, and other dogs.

A biking map is provided by Flume Trail Mountain Bikes. You’ll want to go north on North Canyon Trail. Bikes are not allowed on Marlette Lake Trail. Once you hit Marlette Lake, make sure to go towards the west side of Marlette Lake to the Marlette Flume Trail or Flume Trail and on to Tunnel Creek Rd and Incline Village.

We recommend taking a look at the entire map of the Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park Spooner Backcountry which includes roads, biking trails, hiking trails, campgrounds, facilities and other park amenities. It will help you get a great sense of the surrounding area and trails you don’t want to be on if biking. Link to Map: http://parks.nv.gov/forms/Spooner_backcountry_map.pdf

Want more of a challenge and a 24 mile ride? Try the Tahoe Rim Trail at Tahoe Meadows which also connects to the Flume Trail. Pay attention to signs as bikes are only allowed on the Tahoe Rim Trail on even days and not in all sections.

Interested in camping? There are walk-in campgrounds at Marlette Peak, Hobart, and North Canyon. There are also 2 cabins are located at Spooner Lake if you want to make a weekend to bike the trail, hike, and enjoy the outdoors. Contact ltnsp@parks.nv.gov or call 775-831-0494 for more information on camping or cabins. You can always consider staying in the many lodging options Inline Village, NV or the surrounding Lake Tahoe area.

The Flume Trail starts and ends at:

Spooner Lake – Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park
Carson City, NV 89703
GPS Coordinates 39.106158, -119.917994 Map

Tunnel Creek Station
1115 Tunnel Creek Rd, Incline Village, NV 89451
Incline Village NV 89451
GPS Coordinates 39.234284, -119.930150 Map
http://www.tunnelcreekstation.com/about-tunnel-creek-station.html


Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Carson City | Incline Village | Lake Tahoe | Nevada
Activities: Mountain Biking, Sports, Sports-Fitness

Acadia National Park – Dog Friendly Outdoor Adventure Guide

Acadia National Park (Bar Harbor, ME) has over 100 miles of hiking trails and 45 miles of roads. This park is consistently rated one of the top parks in the nation. And the majority of the park is dog friendly. There’s so much to do here year-round; hiking, camping, biking, sightseeing, fishing, winter sports, and more. 

The Island Explorer shuttle bus runs between Bar Harbor and Acadia National Park. The shuttle is fare-free and dog friendly. Routes run from June through October. There’s a bicycle express that you can take, although they may not be able to take tandem bikes. Check the Island Explorer website for updated run dates, timetables, and more information.

Pets are not allowed in some areas of the park. They are also prohibited from entering bodies of water and must be kept on a 6 foot leash. Some trails and beaches (Sand Beach and Echo Lake) are off-limits to pets during peak season only. Click here for more information about bringing pets at Acadia National Park.

Maps for Acadia can be found on the National Park Service website. Need more maps of the area? Check out the maps offered by the Acadia Chamber.

Nearby towns of Bar Harbor and Southwest Harbor are extremely dog friendly if you want stop for dinner on your way home. Looking for a dog park? We hear there’s a place outside the park just south of Jordan Pond between Seal Harbor and Northeast Harbor past a stone and wood gate.

GPS Coordinates: 44.40897, -68.24727 (Visitor Center) Map


See our full list of Dog Friendly Outdoor Adventure Guides made just for dog owners. We give you everything you need to plan your next adventure outing with your dog right at your fingertips. We also pick the best dog friendly trails for you! These destination guides are invaluable one-stop source of information if you have a dog!


HIKING

 

Acadia National park has over 100 miles of hiking trails. There’s always a new place to explore.

Some of the most popular hikes include the 27 mile Park Loop Road or the Cadillac Summit Trail Loop (0.4mi). The park provides many maps that highlight each trail. Don’t leave the area without grabbing some food and an amazing popover at Jordan Pond House.

Day hiking with your dog is also available a ferry ride away on Isle au Haut (“High Island”) – go early as visitors are limited on the island. Hiking on the island is rough, but there are a lot of short loops.


CAMPING

 

Acadia National Park (Bar Harbor, ME) has 3 dog friendly campgrounds: Blackwoods, Seawall, and Schoodic Woods. Book early as spots fill up quickly.


BIKING

 

Biking is only permitted in certain areas of the park. Bikes are not allowed on hiking trails. Dogs must be on leash biking or hiking. Don’t have a bike? There are plenty of bike rental shops in Bar Harbor and Southwest Harbor to consider.

Some areas actually permit bikes and dogs, but we don’t recommend them for dogs due to safety. These areas include: Park Loop Trail, Cadillac Mountain, Penobscot Peninsula, and Summit Road.

Carriage Roads: This is really where you want to be biking with your dog in Acadia. The carriage roads are 45 miles of mostly gravel road and car-free, but also open to hikers and horses. You’ll likely pass by waterfalls and the most picturesque views around.The Jordan Pond House is a great place to hike and stop for a bite to eat on the lawn. Please watch signs as some carriage roads are closed to bikes. During winter, fat tire bikes are not allowed on the carriage roads as they have been groomed.

Southwest Harbor: Southwest Harbor is cut off from the Carriage Roads by Somes Sound, the only North American fjord created by a glacier. There are a lot of fishing and road biking here. Roads here are not as heavily populated. Still, you do share the road so make sure your dog is well trained and that you proceed with caution.

Schoodic Peninsula: Schoodic Peninsula is another biking destination. The main biking route from Winter Harbor is about 10 miles of gravel pathways. Plan to have a picnic at Grindstone Neck or Schoodic Point. Longer bike rides are available from Frazer Point. Some areas are challenging and steep. Roads in this area are one-way only. During winter, the path is open to everyone when ungroomed. https://www.nps.gov/acad/planyourvisit/schoodic.htm

 

How was your trip? What trail or campground did you go to? Do you have any tips that you want to pass on to fellow dog owners? 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Related Pawtivities / Events: Hiking, CampingBiking, RunningAcadia National Park, Cross Country Skiing, Snowshoeing

Location: Bar Harbor, ME | Frenchman Bay | Maine
Activities: Beach, Hiking, Camping, Walking, Biking, Sightseeing

Best Biking Accessories for Dogs (2018) – Pawtivity Picks

We love learning about the latest doggy stuff out there because we all want the best for our furry friends! Each week we cover the fun, novel, essential, and new products for dogs in our Pawtivity Picks Series.

Getting started biking with your dog? It’s a great way to give your dog some real exercise! Summer is the perfect time to go out road biking or mountain biking with your dog. This week we cover biking accessories for dogs. We give you the best all-around bike accessories for dogs so you can get started off on the right paw.

If you are new to biking, be sure to read our article for tips on how to get started biking with your dog.

Start on smaller distances if biking with your dog and gradually move to longer distances over time. Your dog needs time to build up his paw pads so they don’t get worn out. They also need to develop the endurance and stamina to keep up with you on a longer ride.
 

If you are just getting started biking with your dog, here are a few other articles you should read:

  • How To Bike With Your Dog Read Now
  • How To Train Your Dog To Run With You Read Now
  • Top 10 Bike Trails That Allow Dogs (with links to trip planning guides and listings) Read Now

Products Covered: Bike Attachment, Bike Leash, Dog Bike Trailer, Dog Cooling Vest, Dog Cooling Harness, Dog Harness, Water Storage Bag, Water Bladder, Water Filter, Dog Bowl

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


BIKE ATTACHMENTS & LEASHES

 

We recommend that you keep a controlled distance between your dog and your bike so that your dog does not run into your bike as you ride. This is usually accomplished with a proper bike attachment with a solid arm that is then then tied to a short, flexible leash attached to your dog.

Never hand carry a flexible leash of any kind as the leash can get wound up in your bike or it can cause you to lose control of your bike risking injury to both you and your dog.

Most bike attachments connect to your bike near your seat or towards the rear wheel. A great feature to look for is the ability for left and right side attachment to your bike. You also want some sort of shock absorber so you feel less of an impact every time your dog pulls.

Keep in mind that you may need to go on a wider trail with a bike attachment to maintain a safe distance and to provide a comfortable experience for you and your dog. If you have a small dog, we highly recommend using a padded harness instead of a collar with the bike attachment.
 

Bike Tow Leash Bicycle Attachment

The Bike Tow Leash Bicycle Attachment* is consistently rated as one of the best bike attachments for dogs. Most consumers love how durable this bike attachment is. It’s also highly effective in preventing the bike from tipping if your dog pulls away.

The Bike Tow Leash features a hard, bent arm that can be mounted to the rear wheel from the left or right side without any special tools. There’s a flexible joint between the arm and bike that gives your dog greater mobility when running.

The bike attachment can be used with any bike, mobility scooter, trike, or wheelchair. You can also use the bike attachment using a dog coupler* to run with two dogs.

 

The Bike Tow Leash is the only bike attachment to get a coveted 5 star rating by the American Pet Association. The APA stated that the bike tow leash was the “safest bike leash” they had ever seen. The 5 Star rating is awarded on products that are high quality, humane and safe to pets and people. Businesses that receive this rating practice good business ethics and continually seek ongoing feedback about their product.

One drawback of this bike attachments is the high price. The MSRP is $146, which is 2-3 times the price of many other bike attachments. However, users praise the durability of the Bike Tow Leash and long lasting use. Additionally, the extra safety the Bike Tow Leash affords will pay for itself over and over as the price difference is less than one vet or ER visit. If you are an avid bike rider, you are getting your money’s worth by investing in this bike attachment.

Dog owners rave about the product. Our favorite review is from Scott in Texas who commented that their dog bolted after a deer 10 yards away and he was still able to maintain perfect control of his bike. That’s saying something. We are happy no harm came to human, dog, and deer!

WHY WE LOVE: This bike attachment is so easy to use. We love how much movement (and “freedom”) your dog has to run with your bike while remaining in a safe, controlled distance from the bike.

Take me to the Bike Tow Leash Bicycle Attachment* now.
 

Walky Dog Bike Leash

The Walky Dog Bike Leash* has a straight arm that attaches to your bike just below your seat. There’s a strong paracord leash inside and springs that provide a great shock absorbing system. You can remove springs to adjust how much shock absorption you need based on how strong your dog pulls.

The Walky Dog can be used on either the left and right side of the bike without using any special tools. This bike attachment is very durable. The leash can handle pulls up to 550 pounds! There’s a really nice quick release feature to detach the bike attachment from your bike. The MSRP of this bike attachment is about $59 – a great price!

With the Walky Dog, your dog will actually remain running at the side of your bike. Some noted that you get a smaller distance between your dog and the bike with the Walky Dog, so you’ll need to factor in how much room your dog needs to get a comfortable running stance in. You can adjust the tension and length of the bike attachment by adjusting the number of inside springs.

If you want a lower attachment where your dog runs to the side of your rear wheel, Walky Dog sells a Low Rider Bike Attachment*. You may have to adjust the springs and inside leash to suit your dog. You want to make sure that your dog runs below the placement of the bike attachment to ensure safety.

WHY WE LOVE: We just love the quick release feature to this bike attachment. No need to bring a separate leash. Just release the bike attachment and use it as a short leash.

Take me to the Walky Dog Bike Leash* now.


DOG BIKE TRAILER

 

If you have a small dog or senior dog, consider getting a dog bike trailer for them so that they can come along with you on your next bike ride. They won’t be getting exercise in, but will still love getting out on a ride with you!
 

DoggyRide Mini Dog Bike Trailer

The DoggyRide Mini Dog Bike Trailer* is the perfect trailer for a small dog up to 55 pounds who can’t enjoy running alongside your bike. The trailer is very lightweight to give you a break from hauling a heavy load! The turning radius of the trailer is also smoother and tighter than other trailers.

This bike trailer features a strong, breathable mesh opening and superior, padded floor to help minimize a bumpy ride. A rain cover is included on the trailer. Safety leash connections are located inside the trailer. A sunroof is accessible from the top if your dog just wants to poke his head out and look around. Storing the trailer is easy with a quick release of a pin.

For a lightweight trailer, the frame and materials used on this bike trailer are still top notch. The company even places a warranty on fabric for 1 year and frame for 5 years. If you want to use the bike trailer as a stroller, you can purchase a separate stroller converter kit*. Many purchase the separate pad* to give their dog a more comfortable ride.

WHY WE LOVE: If we can’t run with our small dog, then this is the perfect option to let them see and really enjoy a ride. We also don’t want to the trailer to weigh us down!

Take me to the DoggyRide Mini Dog Bike Trailer* now.
 

Burley Tail Wagon

Although one of the most expensive dog bike trailers on the market, the Burley Tail Wagon* is also one of the very best. This trailer was made for the small to large dog up to 75 pounds.

The Burley Tail Wagon has 4 sides of breathable mesh, an integrated rain cover, and attachments to secure your dog inside the trailer. The design of the wagon allows your dog to sit comfortably. They can even stick their head out of the trailer if you roll up the cover. The trailer folds down very easily for storage. A removable floor makes it easy to clean the trailer.

A handlebar and parking brake is included with the trailer. However, to double the trailer as a stroller, you will need to purchase a separate stroller kit. Burley has both a 1 Wheel Stroller* or 2 Wheel Stroller* kit.

WHY WE LOVE: We love how easy this is to clean. It’s just impossible to avoid muddy paws with a dog! It’s easy to see the trailer lasting for years and giving your dog the most comfortable ride each time.

Take me to the Burley Tail Wagon* now.


DOG BIKE HARNESSES & COOLING VESTS

 

Hurtta Cooling Harness

The Hurtta Cooling Harness doubles as a cooling vest and harness. The vest works by dipping it in water and wringing it out. It’s easy to tell when the vest becomes dry as the color changes slightly.

The harness features breathable mesh fabric that extend from the chest to the belly. There is even a detachable water pouch that you can fill with cold water located at the dog’s chest to maximize cooling power where your dog needs it most. An adjustable collar and chest strap allow for the greatest fit for your dog. Leashes can be attached to a sturdy O ring attachment at the top of the vest.

WHY WE LOVE: We really love the full integration of harness and cooling vest in one. This makes is so much easier to put on your dog without any fuss or further adjustments. The O ring and adjustment straps also allow for better mobility and fit for your running dog. And separate water pouch that you can store in the fridge – well, we just have to try it out!

Take me to the Hurtta Cooling Harness now.
 

Ruffwear Front Range Harness & Jet Stream Cooling Vest

The Ruffwear Front Range Harness* is a great all-around harness for any active dog. It features foam padded straps and 4 points of adjustment for a great fit on any dog. It’s the best option for running with a bike attachment, but you’ll want to attach the leash to the top of the harness rather than the front. Ruffwear does make other harnesses that can be used to help your dogs over obstacles, but most bikers won’t need that on the trail. Hate having flying tags clink together as your dog runs? This harness has a place to hide those id tags!

Need a cooling vest that fits with your harness? Consider the Ruffwear Jet Stream Cooling Vest*which fits under the Front Range Harness and gives a bit more mobility and less bulk than the Ruffwear SwampCooler.

The Jet Stream cooling vest works to pull heat from the dog and works by applying water on the vest and wringing it out. Full coverage of the UPF 50+ vest provides the most shade and cooling effect for your dog. It can be worn of course, without the harness for off leash play. The vest will stay cool for perhaps an hour which is more than enough time for your dog to run as you bike! You will need to get a more exact fit with the cooling vest as it doesn’t have adjustable straps. If your dog has a larger chest, you may want to stick with the Ruffwear Swamp Cooler.

WHY WE LOVE: Dogs get hot running and we love the combination of using the cooling vest with harness while still leaving the option to have a separate harness for the rest of the year.

Take me to the Ruffwear Front Range Harness* or Ruffwear Jet Stream Cooling Vest* now.


WATER BOTTLES, BLADDERS, AND BOWLS

 

Water is the most important thing you can bring with you on a bike ride with your dog. While biking, you want to carry as minimal as you can and as compact as you can. That means no loose clothing and items hanging off your bag or bike. You can probably leave the dog backpack at home too.

We recommend getting one storage container to provide enough water for both you and your dog. While you can always carry your preferred bottle on your bike as you ride, you’ll need to stop anyway to give frequent water breaks to your dog. We like carrying a small, snug backpack and bringing extra water in a collapsible container. Don’t forget a lightweight dog bowl!

How much water you and your dog need depends a lot on how much energy you are exerting, how much you sweat, activity level, and outside temperature. You’ll get a better sense of how much you and your dog needs on a bike ride by going out more.
 

Hydrapak Seeker

The collapsible Hydrapak Seeker* is a lightweight, durable and compact water storage bag that’s made of abrasion resistant material. It’s also 100% BPA & PVC Free. The storage bag is designed for both hot water up to 140 degrees farenheit and freezing cold water. You can also freeze the entire storage bag to use as an ice pack.

This storage bag is a great option for backpackers, hikers, and bikers. There’s a strap attachment option. The storage bag comes in 2 colors and 3 sizes – 2 liter, 3 liter, and 4 liter.Bags are fully collapsible to fit into a 4x4in storage bag making this highly versatile even as a backup water source. Measurements are included on the side so you always know how much water you have left.

The Hydrapak Seeker is compatible with the Katadyn Befree Filter* or other 42mm bottle filter if you plan to source water from area streams and water sources. Read more about it from our top picks for water filters.

WHY WE LOVE: It’s made for both cold and hot water, a plus for winter activities! We also love that it’s compatible with the Katadyn water filter. You can’t go wrong going with a larger bag as it’s highly collapsible and still ultra-light.

Take me to the Hydrapak Seeker* now.
 

Freemove Hydration Pack Water Bladder & Cooler Bag

If you are able to ride long distances with your dog, consider the Freemove Hydration Pack Water Bladder & Cooler Bag* This water bladder is perfect for a hot summer bike ride. It holds 2 liters of water and made of durable TPU fabric and BPA free. A cooler bag fits on the outside of your water bladder keeping your water cool. The mouthpiece features a valve to switch the water on and off. This helps prevent leaking.

Very reasonably priced at only $19.85 MSRP, it’s a great option for bikers that need more water they can carry with them easily. Freemove offers a 100% satisfaction guarantee so there’s no risk to buying.

WHY WE LOVE: Who doesn’t want cool water on a bike ride? Ahhhh. And you don’t have to carry separate attachments anywhere. J

Take me to the Freemove Hydration Pack water Bladder & Cooler Bag* now.

Don’t have a backpack for your water bladder? Here’s one*.
 

Rad Dog Collaspible Pocket Bowl

Rad Dog’s Collapsible Pocket Bowl* is probably the smallest, foldable dog bowl we have seen on the market – it fits in the palm of your hand! The bowl is also waterproof and extremely lightweight at less than 1 ounce. The bowl can carry up to 16 ounces of water. We think backpackers, runners, and bikers would love this bowl for their dogs!

While super small, it doesn’t have the most stable base. It’s also pretty easy to lose and not visible for evening or night camping use. You may just have to hold it up for your dog to drink or eat.

WHY WE LOVE: It’s so minimal and best for those that want to carry as little as possible. Who wants to run or bike with a bulky bowl in their pocket or flapping against their bag?

Take me to the Rad Dog’s Collapsible Pocket Bowl* now.

 


Leave a comment if there are any other products you think are worth letting everyone know about! Please let us know why you like it, how you use the product, and how long you have been using it for.

 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Activities: Shopping, Hiking, Biking, Running, Camping, Great Outdoors

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Best Hiking Water Filters For You & Your Dog (2018) – Pawtivity Picks

We love learning about the latest doggy stuff out there because we all want the best for our furry friends! Each week we cover the fun, novel, essential, and new products for dogs in our Pawtivity Picks Series.

This week we looked at water filters and bottles that you can use for your dog. These fit easily in their dog backpack or in yours. Water filters are great if you are going on a multi-day hike or backpacking with a lot of reliable water sources.

We cover three main hiking water filters and purification systems that we consider the best for hikers. Each system comes with a few additional options to consider that may be suitable for your particular needs. We think these systems suit our readers the best. They are easy to use, portable, and highly functional.

To learn more about travel water bowls and bottles that may complement your water filtration system, read our article Best Travel Water Bowls and Bottles For Dogs.

Need to know how much water to bring for your dog? Read our article, How Much Water Should I Bring For My Dog Hiking? to learn more.

Products Covered: Hiking Water Filter, Portable UV Water Purifier, Water Bottle

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


BACKPACKING WATER FILTERS

 

Katadyn Befree Water Filtration System

The Ketadyn Befree 1.0L Water Filtration System* features a water filter inside a flexible and collapsible water bottle. It’s the perfect individual portable water filter for you and our dog. It can serve for a day hike or backup water supply source for a weekend backpacking trip. The whole thing is 2.3 ounces in weight, which is great if you just want to go out running, biking, or backpacking and weight is important to you. It’s also nice to take with you when traveling overseas.

Since the filter is already inside the bottle, all you need to do is fill up your bottle and drink as you normally would. There’s no need to wait for all the water to get filtered. This system has a wider mouth making it easier to fill. The flow rate on the system is 2 liters per minute which is one of the fastest on the market. The filter removes 99.9% of bacteria, giardia, and cryptosporidium exceeding EPA standards. Filters last for 1,000 liters of water. To clean the filter, just swish it in fresh, clean water.

This water filtration system also comes in two other sizes; a smaller 0.6L (20 oz)* and a larger 3.0L (101 oz)*. The small system can fit in any dog backpack. The larger system can be shared between you and your dog. The MSRP of each system are as follows: 1) 0.6L at $39.95 2) 1.0L at $44.95 and 3) 3.0L at $59.95.

If you don’t want to leave the filter on, you can cap it with a standard bottle cap which is useful if just storing water in your dog’s bag. When filled, you can see water through the bottle. A little water is all that is necessary to make the bottle stand up.

 

WHY WE LOVE: It’s just so portable and there is very little extra training or extra parts to carry. Everything is self-contained.

Take me to the Ketadyn Befree 1.0L Water Filtration System* now.
Or the 0.6L* or 3.0L* version.

 

SteriPen

Don’t like the slow process of filtering water or transferring to a bottle? Consider getting the SteriPen, an ultraviolet light water purifier. While pricier than standard water filter systems, the extra cost is well worth if you intend to use it a lot. It will last you through about 8,000 liters of water.

All SteriPens are backed by a three-year warranty. They work with a wide variety of bottle sizes so can be more versatile than water filter systems.

One of the best aspects of the SteriPen is that it’s just so easy to use! All you have to do is to fill up a small-mouth water bottle (like from a Smartwater bottle) and stick the SteriPen in the bottle. And it takes about 90 seconds to do so for 1 liter (or 32 ounces) of water! That’s pretty fast. Don’t worry, the SteriPen lets you know when your water is ready to drink so you don’t have to guess.

The UV-C light emitted by the SteriPen treats more than 99.9% of microorganisms, including Giardia, bacteria, viruses and protozoa Protozoa, bacteria, and viruses. In fact, the Water Quality Association awarded the SteriPen with a Gold Seal for water safety and effectiveness.

One downside is that the SteriPen only works with water that is already pretty clear and sediment free. It’s also possible to get contaminated water on the outside of your bottle, but you just need to wipe these down before you drink. For some models you do have to carry extra batteries or a power source. You don’t need these with water filters.

SteriPens are probably the best system to use in the winter. They are fast and can be used with wide mouth bottles that don’t freeze as easily as small mouth bottles. Just make sure you don’t use Alkaline batteries which contain liquid inside that can freeze.

There are a few varieties of the SteriPen. We think the SteriPen Adventurer Opti and SteriPen Classic 3 are the best options for frequent and multi-day hikers. We provide some more information on each model below. If you are looking for a USB rechargeable option consider the SteriPen Ultra or ultra-light SteriPen Freedom.

SteriPen Classic 3 with Pre-Filter

The SteriPen Classic 3* is the upgraded version of the original SteriPen. It treats water and comes with a removable twist-off lamp cover and prefilter to separate out debris from your water.

Their SteriPen Classic 3 can be used with 4 AA alkaline batteries, not included, to treat up to 50 liters of water. If you use a lithium battery it will treat up to 150 liters of water. A NiMH battery will treat up to 200 liters of water. According to SteriPen, each battery set will last about 80 treatments.

This model is only 2.9 ounces – that’s pretty light! The SteriPen Classic 3 also fits bottles with a minimum diameter of 22mm. The MSRP is $69.95. Remember, batteries are not included with this model and will actually bring the total weight to 6.3 ounces.

WHY WE LOVE: We think this model is suitable for most hikers. We also like the inclusion of the filter. It’s just so easy to use and you can continue to use your favorite bottle or use on multiple bottles with ease.

Take me to the SteriPen Classic 3 with Pre-Filter* now.

SteriPen Adventurer Opti

The SteriPen Adventurer Opti* is a higher end model of the SteriPen built specifically for use in mountain and river water sources. It won the several awards and can be used even if you are off the power grid for a few days. The SteriPen Adventurer Opti has a water sensor that can also be used as a flashlight. This model does not come with a prefilter.

The battery source on this SteriPen is different than other models. It actually uses CR123 rechargeable batteries which will last you up to 50 liters of water. According to SteriPen, each battery set will last about 30 treatments. While this is a shorter life than batteries of the SteriPen Classic 3, it’s still a long enough time for most people.

If you plan on doing a lot of mountain hiking or adventuring through remote areas of the world this is the best SteriPen for you. The low weight may appeal the most with backpackers. It weighs about 3.8 ounces with included batteries. The SteriPen Adventurer Opti works in bottles with a minimum opening of 35mm. The MSRP is $89.95.

WHY WE LOVE: This is a better option for the ultra-adventurer – those that love to travel and trek off the beaten path. Get peace of mind knowing you are drinking safe water anywhere.</em

Take me to the SteriPen Adventurer Opti* now.

The Sawyer Squeeze Water Filtration System

The Sawyer Squeeze Water Filtration System* has a Sawyer Point One water filter with a cap you can drink directly from or use with other bottles to clean water to 0.1 microns. The system comes with a reusable pouch bottle (up to 3) and a syringe for cleaning the filter. Total weight for the system is 3 ounces.

A great aspect of this system is its lower price point. You can purchase a a filter, syringe, and 3 pouch for $39.99 on Amazon.com. That’s a great value and as a bonus, you don’t need to change the filter. Sawyer claims that the filter can last for up to 1 million gallons.

While this system isn’t as fast as the other two Ketadayn Befree Water Filtration System or the SteriPen, it’s still pretty fast with a flow rate of 1/2 liter per minute. It’s also a better system if you are trying to filter a large quantity of water for more than one person. You can use the Sawyer Squeeze with a variety of small mouth soda-sized bottles and hydration packs.

 

WHY WE LOVE: A great value! This is the filter to get if you are going backpacking with someone else. Share the load and bring one filter for all.

Take me to the Sawyer Squeeze Filtration System* now.


WATER FILTER ACCESSORIES & MORE

 

Stay safe out there on the trail and it’s always worse to bring too little water than too much!!

If you use a hydration bladder and purchase either the Sawyer Squeeze, Sawyer Mini, or Katadyn Water Filtration System, consider purchasing the Sawyer “Fast Fill Kit”* to help you fill up your water bladder. This is currently 50% off on Amazon as of May 2018! A great deal if you use the Ketadyn Befree Water Filtration System.

 

No matter what water filter and purification system you end up going with, always bring a backup. A great backup option is to carry water purification tablets. Aquatabs Water Purification Tablets*. These are so small that you’ll forget about these until you need it most. Keep them in your first aid kit so you always have them handy.

Do you have any other tips or experiences to share with others? Please include them in the comments below!

Leave a comment if there are any other products you think are worth letting everyone know about! Please let us know why you like it, how you use the product, and how long you have been using it for.


Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Sign up TODAY!

Activities: Shopping, Hiking, Camping, Backpacking, Great Outdoors, Running, Food, Biking, Sports – Water, Sports – Winter

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

Hiking & Backpacking Trail Food For Dogs

Hiking & Backpacking Trail Food For Dogs

Food on the trail? It’s important to take food for your dog if you are going on long hike. You need to replenish your dog’s energy and strength. Extra protein is great for your dog.

There are several trail food options for your dog if you are out doing a day hike or multi-day, backpacking trip. We give you an overview of each option.

You’ll need to try different options to see what works for you and your dog. It’s also important to try things on a shorter hike before going on a long one. You don’t want to be surprised if your dog has an adverse reaction to what he eats.


HOW MUCH FOOD DOES YOUR DOG NEED?

 

We are not veterinarians or food nutritionists, so we don’t provide specific recommendations and amounts of food required for your dog. Every dog has different nutritional needs, so please consult your vet.

Find out from your own vet how many calories your dog needs on a daily basis and while hiking. Use the information your vet provides as a baseline and adjust from there. You can mix and match any treats and food so long as it totals up to your total calorie goal.

If your dog is very active, he will need more food. A good rule of thumb is to give about 25% more kibble than your dog’s normal meal for hiking, however, for a lengthy backpacking trip your dog may need 50%-100% more food. It all really depends on how much you hike and in what conditions. Use your best judgement by observing your dog on shorter hikes over time. Keep your vet in the loop so they can best advise you further.

Erin Tuveson’s dog, No Shame, needed about twice the amount of calories per day while hiking the Appalachian Trail! That’s a lot more than most people think is enough for their dog.


HOW DO YOU KNOW WHEN YOUR DOG NEEDS FOOD?

 

A sure sign to tell if your dog needs more food is if he becomes sluggish, if you can feel his ribs, or if he loses weight over time. Unfortunately, It takes time, close observation and experimentation with food to tell for sure. Keep a journal of how long and difficult your hike is and how much you are feeding your dog. Start with shorter hikes and apply whatever you learn to longer hikes.

Consult your vet at all times. They may give you recommendations on better dog foods to meet your dog’s nutritional and caloric needs. Dandruff or scratching, dry coat, loose stool, stomach problems and repeated refusal to eat food are all indications that it’s time to change your dog’s food.

If you are trying a new brand of food or treat, give your dog a little at a time to try. Mix in old food with new food. Over time, gradually increase how much new food you put in until you transition over completely off your dog’s old food. Give your dog a little bit of a treat and wait at least half a day before giving him more.


IS YOUR DOG STILL HUNGRY?

 

As long as your dog is at his idea weight over time he should be fine. That should be your gage for how much you need to feed your dog – not a longing puppy dog stare to get your food! You may want to break up your dog’s meals up into more frequent dog meals. This is helpful if your dog has a tendency anyway to gulp down his food all at once too fast.

If you are heading out on the trail in the morning, bring your dog’s food with you and give him a little at a time while out on the trail. Going out with a full stomach can lead to stomach aches and uncomfortable hike anyway.

Don’t forget that drinking water is just as important as giving your dog the right amount of food. Read our article How Much Water for Hiking & Backpacking With Your Dog? to learn more about carrying and drinking water with your dog on a multi-day hiking or backpacking trip.


ENERGY BARS & TREATS

 

If you run and hike with your dog on the trail, energy bars are perfect. You really don’t want to carry so much bulk while you are moving around a lot. Many energy bars can actually be supplemented as an entire meal for your dog. They can be broken up into smaller pieces as well.

Steer clear of store bought dog biscuits and regular treats. These don’t provide nearly as much nutritional value as energy bars.

Read our article Best Energy Bars For Dogs to find specific food recommendations for your trail dog.

Sometimes your dog still wants a tasty morsel. You can always bring along a few! At least you’ll have room for it if you carry energy bars with you.


KIBBLE

 

For a short day hike, bring along some extra kibble (just your dog’s normal fare) as a snack. Start with about 1/3 the daily amount of your dog’s daily intake of dry kibble.

For a very long hike, you will want to feed your dog a meat-based kibble that provides more calories, protein, and less grain.

Ideally, you want to find the right type of kibble that doesn’t end up with you carrying so much extra weight and bulk. Many specialty dog store carry better brands of kibble.

You could also consider feeding your dog puppy kibble which often comes with more calories and nutritional content then adult kibble or adding in supplements such as peanut butter or oil to your dog’s food.


FREEZE DRIED FOOD

 

If you normally feed your dog raw food, this may be the best alternative to bring while on a multi-day hike. In the freeze-drying process, food is not cooked and still looks like what it does with water inside. Read the ingredients of the food that you buy to make sure that there are no artificial additives. Make sure it also has a AAFCO statement which states that food is “complete and balanced.”

Dogs loves the taste of freeze-dried food, so they can be used as a tasty treat.
Freeze dried meats are expensive, but could mean carrying up to a half less kibble and a lot less weight. Freeze dried foods generally contain better ingredients and made directly from raw foods. Cooked foods often have depleted nutrients.

Freeze dried food can be given without adding water, but some brands suggest that you add water to rehydrate the food.


DEHYDRATED FOOD

 

Dehydrated food is processed by cooking at very low heat until water evaporates.

It takes 2-3 times longer to rehydrate dehydrated food than freeze-dried food. Once dehydrated food is hydrated, it can grow 3-5 times in size.

Like freeze dried food, dehydrated food can be expensive. You also need to wait to have boiled water before you can heat up the food, and then some additional time for the food to cool. Add that to food you need to cook yourself and your dog will be begging for something to eat. To tie him over, give him a bone or treat while you prepare the food.

It’s probably best for you to carry the dehydrated food if your dog loves to romp around in the water. If the food gets wet, your dog will have to eat it or it will spoil.

 

Well there you have it! There’s quite a lot of dog food options. Choosing the right kind of food depends greatly on your dog’s preferences, dog’s nutritional needs, how much you want to carry with you, and activity level.

What do you bring for your dog to eat while on the trail?


Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Red Rock Canyon – Dog Friendly Outdoor Adventure Guide

Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area is located in the Mojave Desert. Many come here to hike, bike, camp, go rock climbing, or go off-roading within the park. Getting a nice workout in is all the better with a breathtaking view of red sandstone cliffs and serene, quiet beauty of the open air.

For those that want to get in the scenery from the car, there’s a 13-mile Scenic Drive with several overlook points and picnic areas.

Nearby is the Las Vegas Strip and surrounding Red Rock Canyon area where you can do some further adventuring and hiking with your dog! We cover trails here within the Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area.


See our full list of Dog Friendly Outdoor Adventure Guides made just for dog owners. We give you everything you need to plan your next adventure outing with your dog right at your fingertips. We also pick the best dog friendly trails for you! These destination guides are invaluable one-stop source of information if you have a dog!


WHEN TO GO

 

Fall and Spring is a great time to visit Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area. Otherwise, exercise caution when hiking with your dog in the summer or winter. You’ll want to avoid times with extreme heat or cold. The temperature in the desert can change very quickly. Summer temperatures can get well over 100 degrees – definitely too hot for your dog.

Daily entry into Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area is by car. Busses and commercial vehicles must charge by car and by person. Annual or senior passes are per person. Most will pay a daily fee of $15 for their car. Other prices and camping fees are available from the Bureau of Land Management website. Prices have been revised as of Feburary 2018.

When you first get to Red Rock Canyon, we suggest you stop by the Red Rock Canyon Visitor Center for paper maps and information on current conditions of roads and trails. Take note of the weather as there are flash floods in the area.

Dogs may not enter buildings but are allowed on leash anywhere in the park. Dogs must be attended by a person at all times. Read further for some important tips on desert safety. Don’t forget to pick up after your dog!


WHAT TO BRING

 

Bring a paper map with you with information on trails and the surrounding area. The Red Rock Canyon Las Vegas website has a great guide for visitors that includes a map and brief information about all 19 trails in the area.

You will want to bring a lot of water with, especially when temperatures are warm. The park actually recommends 1 gallon per person for a day long hike, with 1 more gallon waiting back for them in the car. Considering a 6 hour day, that’s about 128 ounces of water or about 21 ounces of water per hour. We usually recommend drinking 16 ounces per hour for a moderate hike. Your dog should drink about 1/2 an once of water per pound per hour. A 50 pound dog would need about 25 ounces of water per hour (perhaps more by park estimates). Actual results will vary, so it’s important to get a rough approximation for what works for you and your dog. It’s always a good idea to drink water before your hike to help stay hydrated.

Don’t forget to wear protective gear to protect yourself from the sun and to apply sunscreen. A cooling vest or banana will help your dog stay cool.

Too hot out? Consider driving on the 13 mile Scenic Drive of the area. It’s a one way loop around the area. Bring a picnic lunch and get out of the car to enjoy the scenery. Allow for about 45 minutes to drive, and more time if you want to stop. You’ll most likely travel along the Scenic Drive just to get to a trail. There are plenty of accessible parking lots and bathrooms around.


DOG-FRIENDLY HIKING TRAILS

 

There are 19 different hiking trails within Red Rock Canyon Conservation Area. Don’t forget to print or pick up a map at the visitor center.

If you want to find water along the trail, you’ll see the most just after winter. A few trails offer waterfalls and streams but these often dry up towards the summer months. The park does not recommend drinking or wading through natural water sources.

No need to go through all 19 trails. We picked the best dog friendly trails for you! Most trails in the area are about 2-5 miles.

Lost Creek – Children’s Discovery Trail
If you have kids with you, this out and back trail is perfect. It’s only 0.75 miles and features cultural sites, pictographs and other fun, shady places to explore. A section of the trail is on boardwalk, but the rest is not suitable for a stroller and is rocky or sandy. You can usually see a waterfall at the end of the trail during December – April months.

Moenkopi Trail
The Moenkopi Trail is an easy 2 mile trail loop starts just west of the visitor center where you will park your car. You’ll see sweeping views of Calico Hills, Spring Mountains, and La Madre Mountains. La Madre Mountains will be the highest peak you see in the area at 8,150 feet. Be sure to go when it’s not sunny since there is no shade.

Calico Tanks Trail
The Calico Tanks Trail is popular among tourists. It’s a moderate to strenuous 2.5 mile hike that starts at the Sandstone Quarry parking lot and ends with a natural tank and great views. Many make the mistake of passing the parking lot along the Scenic Drive. Watch your footing on this trail as some areas are slippery. Bring water as the trail gets very sunny and hot, but well worth it just to get to see all the beautiful rock formations around the area. You’ll feel like you really saw Red Rock Canyon with this trail. There are several rocks so if your dog isn’t great on rough terrain and scrambling over rocks, you may opt for a different trail.

Ice Box Canyon Trail
The Ice Box Canyon Trail is a 2.6 mile moderate trail that features several waterfalls and shady areas once you cross a bit of open desert to get there. You’ll see them during the months of December through April. It’s a fun place for your dog to explore and climb some large boulders. The trail isn’t well marked so pay attention to where you are at all times.

Keystone Thrust
Keystone Thrust is a popular geological spot in the park where the Pacific and North American continental plates collided 65 million years ago. You can access this popular 2.2 mile moderate trail via the White Rock parking lot.

White Rock / La Madre Spring Loop
Need a trail that’s a bit less crowded and that just goes in a loop? The White Rock / La Madre Spring Loop is a moderate 6 mile trail accessible from the Upper White Rock parking lot, Los Creek Trail parking lot, and Willow Spring Picnic Area. The White Rock Rail connects to the La Madre Spring Loop. This is a great place if you go trail running during winter months. Prepare to see an abundance of colors and one of the best westside views of the park. You’ll even see bighorn sheep in the area!

Looking or more water along the trail? Consider Pine Creek, Oak Creek Canyon, First Creek and Willow Springs Trails.


DESERT SAFETY

 

Most dogs are unfamiliar with desert creatures. They’ve never seen one, nor know quite how to react to something they’ve never seen before. Rattlesnakes and other dangerous animals and insects are in the area. Always have an eye on your dog and never let him per into small dark spaces. You’ll want to do the same, especially to avoid poisonous snakes and insects. If your dog is bitten by a poisonous snake or insect, keep your dog calm and the wound below the heart. Call a nearby vet immediately for more instructions.

Weather is another concern. Temperatures in the Mojave Desert get really cold in the winter or shade and well over 100 degrees in the summer. Summer hiking should be done in the early mornings. Bring water, a cooling vest or bandana for your dog, and perhaps an emergency shade tent.

There is risk of flash floods and summer lightning in the area, so make sure you check for closures or other information prior to heading out. If you are caught in the rain, be alert for flash floods, and move to higher ground if necessary. If there is lightening in the area, seek shelter immediately.

Last of all, there are hazards from desert flora. Don’t forget to bring tweezers if you need to pull out any cacti from your dog’s paws.


CAMPING

 

If you want to go camping, read our listing for Red Rock Canyon – Camping at Red Rock Canyon Campground.

Camping at Red Rock Campground is closed during summer months. Peak months are March and October. Reservations are available at Recreation.gov.

Backcountry camping is allowed with a permit by calling 702-515-5050. Sites must be set up above 5,000 feet and 200 feet away from water sources. Dogs are allowed but must be leashed.

If you are out camping, be sure to watch the sunrise and sunset at Red Rock Overlook and Highpoint Overlook!


BIKING

 

Road biking is allowed along State Route 159 and Scenic Drive. Mountain biking are only allowed in two areas: Cottonwood/Late Night Trailheads off State Route 160 and Mile Marker 12 on Kyle Canyon Road / State Route 157 (Twilight Zone Trails). Mountain biking is not allowed on hiking trails.

 

How was your trip? What trail or campground did you go to? Do you have any tips that you want to pass on to fellow dog owners? 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Related Pawtivities / Events: Red Rock Canyon Hiking, Red Rock Canyon Camping, Trail Running, Biking
Location: Las Vegas, NV | Nevada
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Camping, Backpacking, Biking, Running, Trail Running