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Jekyll Island, GA

Jekyll Island is a beautiful and quiet ocean retreat known for its 8 miles of white sandy beaches and protected natural habitat. It’s also a very dog friendly beach destination to take your dog, even if they do have to be on leash.

On your way to Jekyll Island stop by the Jekyll Island Welcome Center to pick up a map and inquire about area events.

Dogs must be on a 16 ft or shorter leash at all times – head north of South Dunes Picnic Area. Do not let your dog interact with any protected migratory birds and turtles on the island. Dogs are not allowed on the boardwalk nor on South Beach (between South Dunes Picnic Area and 2000′ Northeast of St. Andrews Sound Picnic Area) as well as Glory Beach. Service dogs are excluded from the restriction.

Dog Friendly Things To Do:

Driftwood Beach – This dog friendly beach is located at the north end of Jekyll Island. It’s called Driftwood Beach because of all the large pieces of driftwood that wash up on white sandy shore. Dogs love exploring the area and playing on the beach. You may even spot some dolphins out towards the water.

Great Dunes Beach Park – This is a great family beach that is also dog friendly. It’s located near the middle of the island. There are showers available at this location.

St. Andrews Beach – This is another dog friendly beach accessible via the St. Andrews Picnic Area. The beach is located on the southwest side of the island and a great place to go shelling and see wildlife. If you walk all the way south, you will see a shipwreck at the very southern end of the island.

Biking – There are several biking trails that go around the island. For a bike map of the island click here. You can also refer to this map which also shows places of interest. You don’t have to bring your bike as there are plenty of bike rental shops around, however, you will still need to have your dog on a leash.

Jekyll Island Campground – This campsite is at the north side of the island. There are 158 campsites, bath houses, and bike rentals nearby. Book online at The campground is located at 1197 Riverview Dr., Jekyll Island, GA 31527. Call 912.635.3021 for more information.

Jekyll Island Fishing Center – Head over to the fishing pier at the very north side of the island if you want to go fishing or crabbing. You will need a license. The fishing center is located at 10 Clam Creek Rd, Jekyll Island, GA 31527. Call (912) 635-3556 for more information. Farther down on Clam Creek Rd is the Clam Creek Picnic Area where you can stop, explore the oak-saw palmetto forest, and grill up your daily catch. You can also hop on to a trail that will take you do Driftwood Beach.

There’s a lot more to do on Jekyll Island, but there are still many places that do not allow dogs. Learn more from the Jekyll Island official travel website and Jekyll Island Georgia website.

 


Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Jekyll Island | Georgia
Activities: Beach, Swimming, Sports – Water, Outdoor Play, Biking

Rosie’s Dog Beach, CA

Rosie’s Dog Beach is a 4 acre off leash dog park is located in Long Beach, CA. The park features ocean swimming and a wash area. As LA County’s only off leash dog park, this beach is a popular destination for those that want to spend a day at the beach with their best furry pals.

The park is located between Roycroft and Argonne Avenues. There are some restrictions at times, so pay attention to area notices. Dogs are allowed only between 6:00am – 8:00pm. Parking can be found in the Bennett Avenue lot. Detailed park rules are located on the Long Beach Parks, Recreation and Marine website at http://www.longbeach.gov/park/park-and-facilities/directory/dog-parks/.

 


Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Long Beach | California
Activities:Beach, Swimming, Sports – Water, Outdoor Play, Dog Park

Beach Dog

Montrose Beach Dog Friendly Area, IL

Montrose Beach Dog Beach Chicago’s first off-leash dog beach located at the northwest end of Montrose Beach on Lake Michigan. It’s huge at 4 acres, so there’s plenty of room for dogs to run free.

The dog beach is open from sunrise to 9pm. Dogs must have DFA (Dog Friendly Area) tags, which can be purchased at participating veterinarian offices for $5 and proof of updated vaccinations and license. A dog wash area is provided to help get all that sand off your dog before getting back into the car!

Please note that dogs are not allowed on outside of the dog beach on Montrose Beach.

GPS Coordinates 41.968583, -87.643520 Map

 


Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Chicago | Illinois Activities:Beach, Swimming, Sports – Water, Outdoor Play, Dog Park

Best Dog Beaches & Vacations Part 1

Best Dog Beaches & Vacations Part 1

Summer is here! We are on the hunt for the best dog friendly beaches and vacations. Look out for our 4 part series covering the Best Dog Beaches & Vacations in the United States.

Here are some great dog-friendly beaches (Part 1 of 4):

 

A summary of the beach or location is included below, but you’ll have to go to our specific pawtivity listing or destination guide for more information.


 

Sanibel Island, FL

Sanibel Island is consistently rated as one of the best beach destinations in the United States. With it’s pristine white beaches and abundance of shells, it’s no wonder why so many people love the beaches here. To top it all off, Sanibel Island is dog friendly year-round. Save this destination on your pawtivity list (for members) to check off later!

 

Block Island, RI

Block Island is one of the most dog friendly towns offering 17 miles of dog friendly beaches. You’ll have to take a ferry to get there, but consider Block Island to be you and your dog’s own private paradise. There’s plenty of biking, hiking, and beaches.

 

Fort De Soto Park & Dog Beach, FL

Fort De Soto Park is a great place to take your dog over the weekend for a little camping, hiking, and off-leash fun. Dogs are only allowed off-leash wtihin the dog beach. Otherwise, they must be on leash.

Dog Beach
 

San Juan Island, WA

San Juan Island has great beaches, but they offer so much more. Beaches allow fire pits so it’s a great place to spend the day and night. San Juan Island is actually one of three islands in the area. All are great spots to go whale watching, kayaking, hiking, and biking. Feel like taking a break from the beach? Visit a lavendar farm or vineyard with your dog!

 

Mission Bay Park / Fiesta Island, CA

Mission Bay Park / Fiesta Island is probably one for local for San Diegans, but we do like the thought of having an off leash dog beach and on its own island. It’s doggy heaven to us. There’s 27 miles of shoreline to play in and plenty of water sports and rentals around.

Mission Bay Park - San Diego, CA
 

Do you have any other recommendations for dog friendly beaches? Or suggestions on other things to do at the beaches we mentioned above?

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Related Pawtivities: Dog Park, Swimming, Beach Camping, Hiking, Biking, Running, Play Tug, Play Frisbee
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Sports-Water, Swimming, Beach, Great Outdoors, Outdoor Play, Sightseeing, Travel

Block Island, RI

Block Island is one of the most dog friendly towns offering 17 miles of beaches that are dog friendly all year round! Dogs must be on leash. There’s about 15 different beach areas to visit on the island.

The main tourism website has maps of the area for bike paths, walking trails, and beaches. If you want to go biking, consider going on the 7.5 mile loop to see the whole island.

For an awesome view, go to Mohegan Bluffs accessible via the Mohegan Trail located at 289-, 291 Spring St, New Shoreham, RI 02807 (GPS Coordinates 41.153137, -71.555193 Map). Some also go here to surf and swim.

Grace’s, Dorry’s and Cooneymus Coves offers one of the best places to watch the sunset. It’s also great if you want to go somewhere uncrowded and rather private. Vistiors come here to fish, but it’s not the best for swimming. Another great beach to fish is Charlestown Beach.

If you are looking for a swimming beach some beaches to consider include: 1) Baby Beach – great for kids, 2) Fred Bensen Town Beach – for all day beach lounging and swimming or 2) Ballard’s Beach if you want alcoholic drinks and food.

Other beaches may be more suitable for sightseeing, clamming, surfing, or snorkeling. For hiking trails, consider one of the options from Block Island Family Vacations. They have a great collection of maps and descriptions of each trail. If we were to pick the best for dogs, we would say to check out Elizabeth Dickens Trail for some hiking and beach walking, Nathan Mott Park & Turnip Farm to see some wildflowers, and Rodman’s Hollow for an easy trail that’s marked.

To get to Block Island, you’ll need to take a ferry. You can purchase tickets from The Block Ferry Island. Dogs are allowed on ferries but must be on leash and kept outside. Some hi-speed ferries may permit dogs in carriers only.

Looking for lodgings? Start here.

 


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Block Island | Rhode Island
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Biking, Swimming, Beach

Best Dog Friendly Vacations for Spring & Early Summer

Best Dog Friendly Vacations

Find the best spring & early vacations for you and your dog – see lush waterfall landscapes, wildflowers, and beat the heat of the desert landscape!

1. Acadia National Park, Maine
2. Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio
3. Kootenai National Forest, Montana
4. San Juan Islands, Washington
5. Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Nevada
6. Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah
7. Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah
8. Coyote Buttes / The Wave, Arizona
9. Paria Canyon & Buckskin Gulch, Arizona / Utah
10. White Sands National Monument, New Mexico
11. Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve, Colorado
12. Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona
13. Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona
14. John Muir Wilderness, California


1 Acadia National Park, Maine

Acadia National Park is consistently rated as one the nation’s best national parks, especially for hiking and camping. Terrain extends from the beach to the mountains so there’s a lot to do. The park is located in Bar Harbor, Maine. Acadia is one of the most picturesque parks – so you’ll surely enjoy some majestic views, green evergreen trees, beautiful ponds, and a stunning sunrise if you go early. Don’t miss Cadillac Mountain, Mount Desert Island, and Jordan Pond. The city of Bar Harbor is also dog friendly if you want to stay for a weekender. While the park is beautiful anytime of year, you can come across some rain and fog during spring months. Still worth it to get a glimpse of almost untouched, pure serene beauty. Read our listing for more information.

Hiking - Acadia National Park, Maine

 

2 Cuyahoga Valley National Park, Ohio

Cuyahoga Valley National Park is located in Peninsula, Ohio just outside Cleveland, Ohio. It’s an amazing park for those that live in the area simply because you can do so much there, including some wonderful dog friendly hiking trails. Other things you can do with your dog include camping, fishing, biking, running, snowshoeing, and cross-country skiing. The Cuyahoga River runs through the park which brings a lot of water features and waterfalls to explore. Read our destination guide for more information.

Cuyahoga National Park

 

3 Kootenai National Forest, Montana

Kootenai National Forest is located in Montana and Idaho, and borders Canada. Sub-alpine scenic views will leave your breathless as you hike near cliffs, giant cedars, and large fields. There’s a lot to here from hiking, camping, biking, fishing, camping, and even morel mushroom picking. Winter adds in some snowshoeing or cross-country skiing fun. Read our listing for more information.


 

4 San Juan Islands, Washington

North of Seattle, Washington sits that San Juan Islands. Many come out for some whale watching, kayaking, hiking, and biking. It’s a great place to just go exploring, go on a romantic getaway, and see some different scenery than the typical lush forests and mountains of Washington. Love art? There’s a small community of artists here along with some fabulous food and fun. Read our listing for more information.


 

5 Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area, Nevada

Come out in the spring or early summer to Red Rock Canyon National Conservation Area. You’ll see a whole new world in the Mojave Desert and avoid the hot tortuous heat of the summers . Enjoy breathtaking views of red and orange sandstone cliffs and wildflowers dotting the landscape. You may also come across some petroglyphs or an oasis in the middle of a the desert. Read our destination guide for more information.

Sedona, AZ Red Rock

 

6 Bonneville Salt Flats, Utah

Ever hike or drive on a salt flat? Come on out to the Bonneville Salt Flats in Tooele County, Utah and dazzle your senses. You’ll likely see nothing for miles, but will be mesmerized and enchanted all the same by start white beauty of the salt flats. Don’t forget your sunglasses! It’s best to avoid the area during later summer as it gets very hot. One of the busiest times of the year is during Speed Week, when racers actually race on the flats. You’ll feel like you stepped back in time seeing all the classic hot rods that come out that week. Read our listing for more information.

Bonneville Salt Flats

 

7 Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument, Utah

The Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument in Utah is one of the truly majestic areas that is dog friendly! It’s a great place to go backcountry camping and hiking. You’ll see so many sedimentary rock formations, arches, waterfalls, and mystical slot canyons. Avoid the summer heat by going in the spring or summer. It’s just too hot for the dogs. The best times to go are early spring and fall. Read our listing for more information.

Grand Staircase-Escalante National Monument

 

8 Coyote Buttes / The Wave, Utah

Coyote Buttes / The Wave is located in Utah (Kanab, UT). This is one the greatest adventures for you and your dog. Get out an see colorful, swirling sandstone rock formations. Don’t forget to take some memorable photos too in one of the most photographed landmarks in the United States. You’ll need advanced planning as entry to the area is by lottery only. Read our destination guide for more information.

Hiking Coyote Buttes & The Wave With Your Dog

 

9 Paria Canyon & Buckskin Gulch, Arizona / Utah

Want to see some amazing slot canyons? Visit Paria Canyon & Buckskin Gulch located in Arizona and Utah. The area is best known for it’s colorful and twisted sandstone landscapes, slot canyons, tall cliffs, carved formations, and ancient petroglyphs on deep canyon walls. Each time you go, you may get a different adventure altogether. Be prepared to help you dog up canyon walls or wade through some muddy water. Dogs will need their own permit. Read our destination guide for more information.

Paria Canyon & Buckskin Gulch / Wire Pass, AZ & UT

 

10 White Sands National Monument, New Mexico

Go hiking, backcountry hiking or even sledding on the white sand dunes in New Mexico’s White Sands National Monument. It is recommended to stick with marked trails, but this is one adventure you surely don’t want to miss especially if you drive through New Mexico on a road trip! Get out on an early summer road trip with your dog before temperatures really go up! Read our listing for more information.

White Sands National Monument, NM

 

11 Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve, Colorado

Another sand dune you can’t miss out on is the Great Sand Dunes National Park & Preserve in Colorado. Pay attention to signs as dogs are allowed in certain areas on leash. And don’t forget to sign up for some sandboarding and sand sledding! You will need specific boards out on the dunes. Read our listing for more information.


 

12 Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

Here’s a unique adventure for you and your dog that’s one of a kind. Go to the Petrified Forest National Park in Arizona to see trees older than 218 million years. Trees feature colorful bands. The area is worth exploring. You can also see some petroglyphs or visit an ancient Publoan village. Read our listing for more information.

Petrified Forest National Park

 

13 Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park, Arizona

The Monument Valley Navajo Tribal Park is for the most adventurous hikers that want a breathtaking view of the desert. Or, opt for the scenic drive that goes around the park. You’ll see rock pinnacles all around you. Respect area rules and regulations, especially if you are inside the Indian reservation. Camping options are available. Read our listing for more information.

Monument Valley - Dog Friendly

 

14 John Muir Wilderness, California

Want to see some spring flowers and the best of the Sierra Nevada. Head out on a hiking and camping trip to John Muir Wilderness in California. A great beginner trail to see flowers is the Little Lakes Trail. Head on out late spring to early summer if you are going at higher elevations. Read our destination guide for more information.

John Muir Wilderness

 

Do you have any other recommendations for dog friendly vacations to take during the spring or early summer periods? 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


Join the Pawtivity Community. Meet Other Adventurers That Do What You Love To Do.
Sign up TODAY!

Activities: Hiking, Walking, Camping, Backpacking, Great Outdoors, Outdoor Play, Biking, Running, Sightseeing, Sports – Water, Travel

Best Hiking Water Filters For You & Your Dog (2018) – Pawtivity Picks

We love learning about the latest doggy stuff out there because we all want the best for our furry friends! Each week we cover the fun, novel, essential, and new products for dogs in our Pawtivity Picks Series.

This week we looked at water filters and bottles that you can use for your dog. These fit easily in their dog backpack or in yours. Water filters are great if you are going on a multi-day hike or backpacking with a lot of reliable water sources.

We cover three main hiking water filters and purification systems that we consider the best for hikers. Each system comes with a few additional options to consider that may be suitable for your particular needs. We think these systems suit our readers the best. They are easy to use, portable, and highly functional.

To learn more about travel water bowls and bottles that may complement your water filtration system, read our article Best Travel Water Bowls and Bottles For Dogs.

Need to know how much water to bring for your dog? Read our article, How Much Water Should I Bring For My Dog Hiking? to learn more.

Products Covered: Hiking Water Filter, Portable UV Water Purifier, Water Bottle

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


BACKPACKING WATER FILTERS

 

Katadyn Befree Water Filtration System

The Ketadyn Befree 1.0L Water Filtration System* features a water filter inside a flexible and collapsible water bottle. It’s the perfect individual portable water filter for you and our dog. It can serve for a day hike or backup water supply source for a weekend backpacking trip. The whole thing is 2.3 ounces in weight, which is great if you just want to go out running, biking, or backpacking and weight is important to you. It’s also nice to take with you when traveling overseas.

Since the filter is already inside the bottle, all you need to do is fill up your bottle and drink as you normally would. There’s no need to wait for all the water to get filtered. This system has a wider mouth making it easier to fill. The flow rate on the system is 2 liters per minute which is one of the fastest on the market. The filter removes 99.9% of bacteria, giardia, and cryptosporidium exceeding EPA standards. Filters last for 1,000 liters of water. To clean the filter, just swish it in fresh, clean water.

This water filtration system also comes in two other sizes; a smaller 0.6L (20 oz)* and a larger 3.0L (101 oz)*. The small system can fit in any dog backpack. The larger system can be shared between you and your dog. The MSRP of each system are as follows: 1) 0.6L at $39.95 2) 1.0L at $44.95 and 3) 3.0L at $59.95.

If you don’t want to leave the filter on, you can cap it with a standard bottle cap which is useful if just storing water in your dog’s bag. When filled, you can see water through the bottle. A little water is all that is necessary to make the bottle stand up.

 

WHY WE LOVE: It’s just so portable and there is very little extra training or extra parts to carry. Everything is self-contained.

Take me to the Ketadyn Befree 1.0L Water Filtration System* now.
Or the 0.6L* or 3.0L* version.

 

SteriPen

Don’t like the slow process of filtering water or transferring to a bottle? Consider getting the SteriPen, an ultraviolet light water purifier. While pricier than standard water filter systems, the extra cost is well worth if you intend to use it a lot. It will last you through about 8,000 liters of water.

All SteriPens are backed by a three-year warranty. They work with a wide variety of bottle sizes so can be more versatile than water filter systems.

One of the best aspects of the SteriPen is that it’s just so easy to use! All you have to do is to fill up a small-mouth water bottle (like from a Smartwater bottle) and stick the SteriPen in the bottle. And it takes about 90 seconds to do so for 1 liter (or 32 ounces) of water! That’s pretty fast. Don’t worry, the SteriPen lets you know when your water is ready to drink so you don’t have to guess.

The UV-C light emitted by the SteriPen treats more than 99.9% of microorganisms, including Giardia, bacteria, viruses and protozoa Protozoa, bacteria, and viruses. In fact, the Water Quality Association awarded the SteriPen with a Gold Seal for water safety and effectiveness.

One downside is that the SteriPen only works with water that is already pretty clear and sediment free. It’s also possible to get contaminated water on the outside of your bottle, but you just need to wipe these down before you drink. For some models you do have to carry extra batteries or a power source. You don’t need these with water filters.

SteriPens are probably the best system to use in the winter. They are fast and can be used with wide mouth bottles that don’t freeze as easily as small mouth bottles. Just make sure you don’t use Alkaline batteries which contain liquid inside that can freeze.

There are a few varieties of the SteriPen. We think the SteriPen Adventurer Opti and SteriPen Classic 3 are the best options for frequent and multi-day hikers. We provide some more information on each model below. If you are looking for a USB rechargeable option consider the SteriPen Ultra or ultra-light SteriPen Freedom.

SteriPen Classic 3 with Pre-Filter

The SteriPen Classic 3* is the upgraded version of the original SteriPen. It treats water and comes with a removable twist-off lamp cover and prefilter to separate out debris from your water.

Their SteriPen Classic 3 can be used with 4 AA alkaline batteries, not included, to treat up to 50 liters of water. If you use a lithium battery it will treat up to 150 liters of water. A NiMH battery will treat up to 200 liters of water. According to SteriPen, each battery set will last about 80 treatments.

This model is only 2.9 ounces – that’s pretty light! The SteriPen Classic 3 also fits bottles with a minimum diameter of 22mm. The MSRP is $69.95. Remember, batteries are not included with this model and will actually bring the total weight to 6.3 ounces.

WHY WE LOVE: We think this model is suitable for most hikers. We also like the inclusion of the filter. It’s just so easy to use and you can continue to use your favorite bottle or use on multiple bottles with ease.

Take me to the SteriPen Classic 3 with Pre-Filter* now.

SteriPen Adventurer Opti

The SteriPen Adventurer Opti* is a higher end model of the SteriPen built specifically for use in mountain and river water sources. It won the several awards and can be used even if you are off the power grid for a few days. The SteriPen Adventurer Opti has a water sensor that can also be used as a flashlight. This model does not come with a prefilter.

The battery source on this SteriPen is different than other models. It actually uses CR123 rechargeable batteries which will last you up to 50 liters of water. According to SteriPen, each battery set will last about 30 treatments. While this is a shorter life than batteries of the SteriPen Classic 3, it’s still a long enough time for most people.

If you plan on doing a lot of mountain hiking or adventuring through remote areas of the world this is the best SteriPen for you. The low weight may appeal the most with backpackers. It weighs about 3.8 ounces with included batteries. The SteriPen Adventurer Opti works in bottles with a minimum opening of 35mm. The MSRP is $89.95.

WHY WE LOVE: This is a better option for the ultra-adventurer – those that love to travel and trek off the beaten path. Get peace of mind knowing you are drinking safe water anywhere.</em

Take me to the SteriPen Adventurer Opti* now.

The Sawyer Squeeze Water Filtration System

The Sawyer Squeeze Water Filtration System* has a Sawyer Point One water filter with a cap you can drink directly from or use with other bottles to clean water to 0.1 microns. The system comes with a reusable pouch bottle (up to 3) and a syringe for cleaning the filter. Total weight for the system is 3 ounces.

A great aspect of this system is its lower price point. You can purchase a a filter, syringe, and 3 pouch for $39.99 on Amazon.com. That’s a great value and as a bonus, you don’t need to change the filter. Sawyer claims that the filter can last for up to 1 million gallons.

While this system isn’t as fast as the other two Ketadayn Befree Water Filtration System or the SteriPen, it’s still pretty fast with a flow rate of 1/2 liter per minute. It’s also a better system if you are trying to filter a large quantity of water for more than one person. You can use the Sawyer Squeeze with a variety of small mouth soda-sized bottles and hydration packs.

 

WHY WE LOVE: A great value! This is the filter to get if you are going backpacking with someone else. Share the load and bring one filter for all.

Take me to the Sawyer Squeeze Filtration System* now.


WATER FILTER ACCESSORIES & MORE

 

Stay safe out there on the trail and it’s always worse to bring too little water than too much!!

If you use a hydration bladder and purchase either the Sawyer Squeeze, Sawyer Mini, or Katadyn Water Filtration System, consider purchasing the Sawyer “Fast Fill Kit”* to help you fill up your water bladder. This is currently 50% off on Amazon as of May 2018! A great deal if you use the Ketadyn Befree Water Filtration System.

 

No matter what water filter and purification system you end up going with, always bring a backup. A great backup option is to carry water purification tablets. Aquatabs Water Purification Tablets*. These are so small that you’ll forget about these until you need it most. Keep them in your first aid kit so you always have them handy.

Do you have any other tips or experiences to share with others? Please include them in the comments below!

Leave a comment if there are any other products you think are worth letting everyone know about! Please let us know why you like it, how you use the product, and how long you have been using it for.


Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


Join the Pawtivity Community. Meet Other Adventurers That Do What You Love To Do.
Sign up TODAY!

Activities: Shopping, Hiking, Camping, Backpacking, Great Outdoors, Running, Food, Biking, Sports – Water, Sports – Winter

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

How Much Water Should I Bring For My Dog Hiking?

Dogs need water while hiking, especially in hot weather. How much water you bring depends on where you go, what you do, and how long you hike. You can either carry bottled water with you or give your dog filtered water.

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


CLEAN WATER SOURCES

 

Don’t let your dog drink from a stream unless you treat it properly. Like humans, dogs are susceptible to water contaminants. Drinking salty water may lead to diarrhea and vomiting.

You’ll have to check with the area for known, reliable sources of water. If you are not sure about reliable water sources, bring your own water to be on the safe side. It also helps to store drinking water in your car for after your hike or for emergencies.


HOW MUCH WATER SHOULD YOU BRING?

 

As a general rule for a moderate 2 hour hike, plan to bring 32 oz. of water (16 oz per hour) for yourself and more for your dog. Considering that a dog needs about an ounce of water per pound weight per 2 hours, a 30 pound dog would need about the same amount as you. It never hurts to bring more water than you need, especially in hot or dry weather. Offer water to your dog frequently and let him take small sips

Every person and dog will differ in water needs. Use our guideline as a baseline, but it’s important to get a good estimate on how much you and your dog really need by going on a series of short hikes. Record how much water you and your dog consume every hour and under what conditions. By the time you go on a long hike or backpacking trip, you’ll have a good estimate for how much water you really need for you and your dog.

Be sure to read our articles regarding our top picks for water filters and water bottles that are suitable to use with your dog. Most will even fit in your dog’s backpack and can be shared with you. Or, you can always buy your dog his own filter or bottle!


HEALTH TIPS

 

We are not veterinarians or food nutritionists. We do provide some general tips that may apply universally, but every human and dog has different nutritional needs. Please consult your doctor and vet for information that pertains specifically to you and your dog.

Remember that dogs may actually ingest water if they are playing in water. Make sure play time is kept at about 15-30 minutes. Your dog may actually ingest a lot of water if they retrieve balls or sticks in the water. One way to reduce the amount of water your dog ingests during play is to toss him a flat toy instead a round toy which forces your dog to open their mouth more.

If your dog likes to play with the water hose, don’t spray water directly in your dog’s mouth. This can force your dog to guzzle up too much water.

Dehydration

It’s easy to tell if you are thirsty, but if your dog is not drinking enough water consistently on hikes, it could lead to diseases and serious health problems down the road. If your dog is sick or has a fever, he may also refuse to drink.

Signs of dehydration in dogs:

  • Pale, Dry Gums
  • Excessive Panting
  • Lethargy
  • Sunken Eyes
  • Loose Neck Skin That Doesn’t Retract Quickly After You Pinch It

 

Talk to your vet right away if your dog is dehydrated. You could wrap your dog up in a wet towel on your way to the vet. Consult your vet about giving your dog more water, as this could actually make him vomit.

Humans exhibit similar signs of dehydration as dogs. But a great indicator is dizziness, dry mouth, and sweating. You’ll also have darker urine if you are not drinking enough water.

Severe dehydration will result in low blood pressure, fever, delirium, and even loss of consciousness.

Water Intoxication

While you are out on the trail, don’t gulp down too much water all at once or this could lead to water intoxication, or when there’s too much water in the body and salt levels in your blood get dangerously and sometimes fatally low. One sure way to avoid water intoxication is to take small sips frequently instead of ingesting a lot of water all at once. Remember water play, as we mentioned above, can also make your dog ingest more water.

Signs for water intoxication for dogs:

  • Lethargy
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of Coordination
  • Dilated Pupils or Glazed Eyes
  • Pale Gums
  • Drooling
  • Loss of Consciousness
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Seizing
  • Loss of Consciousness

 

If your dog has lost consciousness or is seizing call your vet immediately!

For humans, a sign of water intoxication is headaches, confusion, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. If you are experiencing leg cramping and have been sweating a lot, try adding salt in your water or eat something salty.

Marathon runners often carry salt packets with them. You could also take sports drinks, gels, or gummies that have electrolytes.

If you like gummy bears try Clif Shot Blocks*! They come in many different flavors and are compact enough to take with you on a run or outdoors. They also don’t taste grainy or sticky like other energy supplements. Each cube gives you a little boost of energy!

 

If you need to learn more about water intoxication in humans, Dr. Axe has a great article where you can learn more. One important tip they mention is that the risk of water intoxication increase is someone drinks more than  1.5 liters of water (over 50 ounces of water) in an hour.

Don’t give salt or electrolytes to your dog, without consulting your vet! Dogs don’t sweat out salt like us humans, but cool themselves off instead by panting and drinking water.


GETTING YOUR DOG TO DRINK MORE WATER

 

Water is important for everyone. If your dog is not drinking enough water on a consistent basis, check with your vet to rule out any diseases or maladies with your dog. These can be serious if not addressed.

Some tips to get your dog to drink more water:

    • Give your dog a reason to drink! Do some exercise and play with your dog.
    • Give your dog water every 15 minutes. Perhaps your constant nagging will remind him to drink!
    • Add chicken, beef, or bone broth to your dog’s water.
    • Always change out your dog’s water so it’s fresh and clean of bacteria or debris. Don’t forget to wash your dog bowl and get rid of any leftover residue and minerals.
    • Train your dog to drink water. You can say “drink” or “water” and give him treats and/or praise every time he takes a sip.
    • Sometimes dogs will try to drink less water if they can’t go outside to do their business. Take them out more to pee.
    • Elevate your bowl. This is a better option for large dogs so they don’t have to stoop down to drink.
    • Try changing dog bowls. Sometimes dogs just don’t like the container they are drinking from. We don’t have an exact answer to this. But it might work! Some dogs are just pickier than others.
  • Buy a water fountain. Your dog may just to drink from a running water source.

A great choice is the Dogit Design Fresh & Clear Pet Fountain*. It’s on sale now at Amazon as of May 2018!

Don’t forget to buy extra filters* that go with it, currently an Add-On item at 45% off. This is a really great deal so we couldn’t help but share! Better take advantage of it now!

 

Leave a comment if there are any other important tips for our dogs! Did you or your dog ever have water intoxication or dehydration? Can you share your story with us? Leave a comment!


Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Activities: Grooming, Health, Shopping, Hiking, Great Outdoors, Walking, Running, Biking, Outdoor Play

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

 

Best Energy Bars For Dogs – Pawtivity Picks

We love learning about the latest doggy stuff out there because we all want the best for our furry friends! Each week we cover the fun, novel, essential, and new products for dogs in our Pawtivity Picks Series.

This week we looked for energy bars to take out on the trail with our dogs. Energy bars are a compact, portable, and slim source of food for your dog. They are much easier to carry around than kibble and bowl. No more crushed or wet kibble! An unopened bar package won’t get spoiled and wet if you are on a trail near water or doing water sports.

Products Covered: Energy Bars

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


WHAT ARE ENERGY BARS FOR DOGS?

 

Energy bars for dogs are short-term energy boosters or meal replacement solutions designed specifically for active dogs. Bars are high in calories so it’s not something you want to give your dog if he’s not active. Bars are also idea for travel rather than the main source of your dog’s daily meal.

Ask your vet for their opinion on which energy bars are best for your dog and activity level. You should also ask them about any known allergies. We can’t recommend a best energy bar for your specific dog. It just depends on his activity level, health, nutritional needs, and calorie requirement.

With all food, give your dog a small sample to try first before heading outdoors. If your dog gets an upset stomach or other adverse reaction from the energy bar, at least you’ll know in advance and be able to consult further with your vet. Don’t forget to try different flavors to keep meal time more interesting for your dog!

Even the best food manufacturers announce food recalls. Always check the FDA’s list for recalls periodically to make sure you are not giving your dog something from the list. Another great source for dog food is Dog Food Advisor.


ENERGY BARS FOR DOGS

 

TurboPUP Complete K9 Meal Bar

TurboPUP Complete K9 Meal Bar* is a popular choice among hikers and backpackers. It’s a complete meal for your dog, meaning, you can give your dog one of these bars in place of his meal! Depending on how much your dog eats, it means not having to carry around kibble and a bowl! And dogs really do love the taste of these. They just do! Flavors come in bacon and peanut butter.

Each bar is 2.2 oz, 250 calories and made from US sourced, human grade, all-natural grain-free ingredients. Bars also come in multipacks for a total of 4.4 oz and 500 calories. Bars can be kept for up to 2 years or up to the ‘best by’ date on the package.

Food is suitable for sensitive stomachs and approved by a lot of picky eaters. Bars are scored and can be broken into pieces easily by hand or given throughout the day as a treat.

If you look at the Nutritional Analysis, bars contain 18% crude protein and 20% crude fat to help sustain energy. Top 5 ingredients are all natural: chickpea flour, whey protein isolate, oil blend (safflower, coconut) organic tapioca solids, and proprietary vitamin and mineral blend.

According to Embrace Pet Insurance, dogs need about 25-30 calories per pound to maintain their weight. For a 50 pound dog, this is roughly 1250 daily calories or 625 per meal twice a day. That means as a meal replacement you may need to give your dog a 4.4 oz package for each meal and perhaps top it off with something else, such as peanut butter. This is important to keep in mind as it’s a very rough estimate of how much food you have to bring for your dog.

WHY WE LOVE: We love this because dogs love this! We also love how this can be used as a ultra-light, compact meal for your dog, perfect for that backpacking and day hiking trip.

Take me to the TurboPUP Complete K9 Meal Bar*now.

 

Zuke’s Power Bones

Zuke’s Power Bones* are a favorite among day hikers. Zuke’s already carries a wide array of treats, that dogs simply love.

With real meat listed as the #1 ingredient and the fact that dog’s love the taste of these treats, getting these treats is a no-brainer. Power Bones comes in 4 flavors; Beef, Chicken, Chicken & Rice, and Peanut Butter.

Power Bones contains about 12% crude protein and 7% crude fat. The top 5 ingredients are meat, ground oats, ground barley, ground rice, and maple syrup. Other ingredients are all natural and include a combination of fruits, vegetables, spices, and preservatives. These treats come in chewy, bite sized chunks about an inch long.

WHY WE LOVE: Zuke’s Power Bones are the prefect little treat for a day hike. We love giving tiny doses of energy (and love) to our dogs while out on the trail.

Amazon currently has an add-on special* on the beef flavor for $5.44 as of May 2018. That’s a really good price. Better take advantage of the awesome deal!!

Take me to Zuke’s Power Bones* now.

 

Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar

We look to hunters for advice on energy bars. The Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar* is new to us, but a staple for many hunting, sporting, and guard dogs. It’s compact and packaged for ultimate portability at any outdoor event, show, or during intense training exercises.

This 400g bar can be broken up into 8 smaller pieces. According to the manufacturer, 100-200g (2-4 small pieces) is enough for a 55 pound dog! That’s a small dose of energy! It will take about 30 minutes to 1.5 hours for the energy bar to take effect.

 

The Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar contains 25% crude protein and 59% crude fat. The top 5 ingredients are fish meal, lard, vegetable fat, grape sugar, and corn. Additional vitamins and minerals have been added to the bar.

A bonus in these treats is that these bars don’t freeze. You can use them in the winter without getting a hard block to give your dog! It’s also packaged so no need to package your own food.

This product is made by Henne Pet Food of Denmark and originally designed for dogsled teams.

WHY WE LOVE: This bar is one small, mighty compact dose of energy for your active dog!

As of May 2018, there is an extra 5% coupon*.

Take me to the Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar* now.

 

Out Bar

The Out Bar is handcrafted in batches by The Great Outdogs. It’s a compact meal replacement for dogs that need a good boost of energy. The bar comes in three flavors; herring, lamb and turkey.

Each piece can be broken up into 4 smaller pieces. A 50 pound dog will need about 3.5 bars per day.

The Out Bar contains 23-28% crude protein and 16-23% crude fat. The top 5 ingredients are animal protein (herring, lamb / lamb liver, turkey / turkey liver), buckwheat flour, green lentils, sweet potatoes, and chickpeas. This may vary slightly based on flavor of the bar. Bars are grain-free, do not contain artificial preservatives, and have added vitamins and minerals. Ingredients are source from North America.

WHY WE LOVE: We love that this bar is handcrafted with quality ingredients.

Take me to the Out Bar now.

 

What energy bars do you get for your dog? For what activity?

Leave a comment if there are any other products you think are worth letting everyone know about! Please let us know why you like it, how you use the product, and how long you have been using it for.


Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


Join the Pawtivity Community. Meet Other Adventurers That Do What You Love To Do.
Sign up TODAY!

Activities: Shopping, Hiking, Camping, Backpacking, Great Outdoors, Running, Food, Biking, Sports – Water, Sports – Winter

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

Kootenai National Forest, MT

The Kootenai National Forest sits in Montana and Idaho. Scenic views will leave your breathless as you hike near cliffs, giant cedars, and large fields. The most popular areas in Kootenai are Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, Ten Lakes Scenic Area known for its carved glacier basins, Lake Koocanusa Scenic Byway, and Ross Creek Scenic Byway.

Dogs must be on leash or restrained in developed recreation areas. We recommend that dogs be well behaved and obey commands well as there are bears, wolves, and other wildlife that roam the area. Dogs are not allowed in swimming areas and on some beaches near water.

With over 1,400 miles of trails, there are a lot of options to consider! Some trails to consider: Ross Creek Cedar Area, Trout Creek National Recreation Trail at 19.8 miles, Kootenai Falls Trail, and Big Therriault Lake Loop Trail. In the summer only, head on to Little Spar Lake and take an 8 mile hike around the lake with your dog. Trails and maps can be found on the USDA website.

Mountain biking and road biking are allowed in the area. Check out mountain biking in the Libby area in the spring where there are over 132 different species of wildflowers. You’ll also want to head down the trails past Kootenai Falls. Check out the Sheldon Mountain bike course or Kootenai Trail.

There are several camping options in the area from standard campsites, to dispersed and RV camping. Most campsites are on a first-come, first-serve basis. Popular campgrounds to consider include Rexford Bench Campground, Loon Lake Campground, Big Therriault Lake Campground, or Timberland Campground. Spar Lake Campground has hiking, biking and a lake in the immediate area. Consider Yaak River Campground if you want to go road biking or be near the Kootenai River.

Large groups or families can consider McGillivray Campground. For cabins, go to Big Creek Baldy Lookout for a great view near Lake Koocanusa. Cabins and campgrounds are listed on the USDA website. Backpackers can refer to camping options here.

If you have a water dog or love fishing for salmon and trout, head over to the Lake Koocanusa area near Libby Dam. Large watercraft and sailing is allowed in the area. There are also campgrounds around the lake.

We hear there are morel mushrooms (non-toxic) in the area – but make sure your dog doesn’t eat a ton of them! Regular mushrooms are toxic to dogs. Some dogs love to hunt morel mushrooms, but you’ll need a permit to collect them.

For winter, go snowshoeing or cross-country skiing with your dog or consider cutting down your own christmas tree.


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Libby, MT | Lincoln County | Montana
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Biking, Tracking, NoseWork, Fishing, Swimming, Camping, Winter-Sports, Cross-Country Skiing, Snowshoeing, Social, Running