How Much Water Should I Bring For My Dog Hiking?

Dogs need water while hiking, especially in hot weather. How much water you bring depends on where you go, what you do, and how long you hike. You can either carry bottled water with you or give your dog filtered water.

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


CLEAN WATER SOURCES

 

Don’t let your dog drink from a stream unless you treat it properly. Like humans, dogs are susceptible to water contaminants. Drinking salty water may lead to diarrhea and vomiting.

You’ll have to check with the area for known, reliable sources of water. If you are not sure about reliable water sources, bring your own water to be on the safe side. It also helps to store drinking water in your car for after your hike or for emergencies.


HOW MUCH WATER SHOULD YOU BRING?

 

As a general rule for a moderate 2 hour hike, plan to bring 32 oz. of water (16 oz per hour) for yourself and more for your dog. Considering that a dog needs about an ounce of water per pound weight per 2 hours, a 30 pound dog would need about the same amount as you. It never hurts to bring more water than you need, especially in hot or dry weather. Offer water to your dog frequently and let him take small sips

Every person and dog will differ in water needs. Use our guideline as a baseline, but it’s important to get a good estimate on how much you and your dog really need by going on a series of short hikes. Record how much water you and your dog consume every hour and under what conditions. By the time you go on a long hike or backpacking trip, you’ll have a good estimate for how much water you really need for you and your dog.

Be sure to read our articles regarding our top picks for water filters and water bottles that are suitable to use with your dog. Most will even fit in your dog’s backpack and can be shared with you. Or, you can always buy your dog his own filter or bottle!


HEALTH TIPS

 

We are not veterinarians or food nutritionists. We do provide some general tips that may apply universally, but every human and dog has different nutritional needs. Please consult your doctor and vet for information that pertains specifically to you and your dog.

Remember that dogs may actually ingest water if they are playing in water. Make sure play time is kept at about 15-30 minutes. Your dog may actually ingest a lot of water if they retrieve balls or sticks in the water. One way to reduce the amount of water your dog ingests during play is to toss him a flat toy instead a round toy which forces your dog to open their mouth more.

If your dog likes to play with the water hose, don’t spray water directly in your dog’s mouth. This can force your dog to guzzle up too much water.

Dehydration

It’s easy to tell if you are thirsty, but if your dog is not drinking enough water consistently on hikes, it could lead to diseases and serious health problems down the road. If your dog is sick or has a fever, he may also refuse to drink.

Signs of dehydration in dogs:

  • Pale, Dry Gums
  • Excessive Panting
  • Lethargy
  • Sunken Eyes
  • Loose Neck Skin That Doesn’t Retract Quickly After You Pinch It

 

Talk to your vet right away if your dog is dehydrated. You could wrap your dog up in a wet towel on your way to the vet. Consult your vet about giving your dog more water, as this could actually make him vomit.

Humans exhibit similar signs of dehydration as dogs. But a great indicator is dizziness, dry mouth, and sweating. You’ll also have darker urine if you are not drinking enough water.

Severe dehydration will result in low blood pressure, fever, delirium, and even loss of consciousness.

Water Intoxication

While you are out on the trail, don’t gulp down too much water all at once or this could lead to water intoxication, or when there’s too much water in the body and salt levels in your blood get dangerously and sometimes fatally low. One sure way to avoid water intoxication is to take small sips frequently instead of ingesting a lot of water all at once. Remember water play, as we mentioned above, can also make your dog ingest more water.

Signs for water intoxication for dogs:

  • Lethargy
  • Diarrhea
  • Vomiting
  • Loss of Coordination
  • Dilated Pupils or Glazed Eyes
  • Pale Gums
  • Drooling
  • Loss of Consciousness
  • Difficulty Breathing
  • Seizing
  • Loss of Consciousness

 

If your dog has lost consciousness or is seizing call your vet immediately!

For humans, a sign of water intoxication is headaches, confusion, nausea, diarrhea and vomiting. If you are experiencing leg cramping and have been sweating a lot, try adding salt in your water or eat something salty.

Marathon runners often carry salt packets with them. You could also take sports drinks, gels, or gummies that have electrolytes.

If you like gummy bears try Clif Shot Blocks*! They come in many different flavors and are compact enough to take with you on a run or outdoors. They also don’t taste grainy or sticky like other energy supplements. Each cube gives you a little boost of energy!

 

If you need to learn more about water intoxication in humans, Dr. Axe has a great article where you can learn more. One important tip they mention is that the risk of water intoxication increase is someone drinks more than  1.5 liters of water (over 50 ounces of water) in an hour.

Don’t give salt or electrolytes to your dog, without consulting your vet! Dogs don’t sweat out salt like us humans, but cool themselves off instead by panting and drinking water.


GETTING YOUR DOG TO DRINK MORE WATER

 

Water is important for everyone. If your dog is not drinking enough water on a consistent basis, check with your vet to rule out any diseases or maladies with your dog. These can be serious if not addressed.

Some tips to get your dog to drink more water:

    • Give your dog a reason to drink! Do some exercise and play with your dog.
    • Give your dog water every 15 minutes. Perhaps your constant nagging will remind him to drink!
    • Add chicken, beef, or bone broth to your dog’s water.
    • Always change out your dog’s water so it’s fresh and clean of bacteria or debris. Don’t forget to wash your dog bowl and get rid of any leftover residue and minerals.
    • Train your dog to drink water. You can say “drink” or “water” and give him treats and/or praise every time he takes a sip.
    • Sometimes dogs will try to drink less water if they can’t go outside to do their business. Take them out more to pee.
    • Elevate your bowl. This is a better option for large dogs so they don’t have to stoop down to drink.
    • Try changing dog bowls. Sometimes dogs just don’t like the container they are drinking from. We don’t have an exact answer to this. But it might work! Some dogs are just pickier than others.
  • Buy a water fountain. Your dog may just to drink from a running water source.

A great choice is the Dogit Design Fresh & Clear Pet Fountain*. It’s on sale now at Amazon as of May 2018!

Don’t forget to buy extra filters* that go with it, currently an Add-On item at 45% off. This is a really great deal so we couldn’t help but share! Better take advantage of it now!

 

Leave a comment if there are any other important tips for our dogs! Did you or your dog ever have water intoxication or dehydration? Can you share your story with us? Leave a comment!


Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


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Activities: Grooming, Health, Shopping, Hiking, Great Outdoors, Walking, Running, Biking, Outdoor Play

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

 

Best Energy Bars For Dogs – Pawtivity Picks

We love learning about the latest doggy stuff out there because we all want the best for our furry friends! Each week we cover the fun, novel, essential, and new products for dogs in our Pawtivity Picks Series.

This week we looked for energy bars to take out on the trail with our dogs. Energy bars are a compact, portable, and slim source of food for your dog. They are much easier to carry around than kibble and bowl. No more crushed or wet kibble! An unopened bar package won’t get spoiled and wet if you are on a trail near water or doing water sports.

Products Covered: Energy Bars

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


WHAT ARE ENERGY BARS FOR DOGS?

 

Energy bars for dogs are short-term energy boosters or meal replacement solutions designed specifically for active dogs. Bars are high in calories so it’s not something you want to give your dog if he’s not active. Bars are also idea for travel rather than the main source of your dog’s daily meal.

Ask your vet for their opinion on which energy bars are best for your dog and activity level. You should also ask them about any known allergies. We can’t recommend a best energy bar for your specific dog. It just depends on his activity level, health, nutritional needs, and calorie requirement.

With all food, give your dog a small sample to try first before heading outdoors. If your dog gets an upset stomach or other adverse reaction from the energy bar, at least you’ll know in advance and be able to consult further with your vet. Don’t forget to try different flavors to keep meal time more interesting for your dog!

Even the best food manufacturers announce food recalls. Always check the FDA’s list for recalls periodically to make sure you are not giving your dog something from the list. Another great source for dog food is Dog Food Advisor.


ENERGY BARS FOR DOGS

 

TurboPUP Complete K9 Meal Bar

TurboPUP Complete K9 Meal Bar* is a popular choice among hikers and backpackers. It’s a complete meal for your dog, meaning, you can give your dog one of these bars in place of his meal! Depending on how much your dog eats, it means not having to carry around kibble and a bowl! And dogs really do love the taste of these. They just do! Flavors come in bacon and peanut butter.

Each bar is 2.2 oz, 250 calories and made from US sourced, human grade, all-natural grain-free ingredients. Bars also come in multipacks for a total of 4.4 oz and 500 calories. Bars can be kept for up to 2 years or up to the ‘best by’ date on the package.

Food is suitable for sensitive stomachs and approved by a lot of picky eaters. Bars are scored and can be broken into pieces easily by hand or given throughout the day as a treat.

If you look at the Nutritional Analysis, bars contain 18% crude protein and 20% crude fat to help sustain energy. Top 5 ingredients are all natural: chickpea flour, whey protein isolate, oil blend (safflower, coconut) organic tapioca solids, and proprietary vitamin and mineral blend.

According to Embrace Pet Insurance, dogs need about 25-30 calories per pound to maintain their weight. For a 50 pound dog, this is roughly 1250 daily calories or 625 per meal twice a day. That means as a meal replacement you may need to give your dog a 4.4 oz package for each meal and perhaps top it off with something else, such as peanut butter. This is important to keep in mind as it’s a very rough estimate of how much food you have to bring for your dog.

WHY WE LOVE: We love this because dogs love this! We also love how this can be used as a ultra-light, compact meal for your dog, perfect for that backpacking and day hiking trip.

Take me to the TurboPUP Complete K9 Meal Bar*now.

 

Zuke’s Power Bones

Zuke’s Power Bones* are a favorite among day hikers. Zuke’s already carries a wide array of treats, that dogs simply love.

With real meat listed as the #1 ingredient and the fact that dog’s love the taste of these treats, getting these treats is a no-brainer. Power Bones comes in 4 flavors; Beef, Chicken, Chicken & Rice, and Peanut Butter.

Power Bones contains about 12% crude protein and 7% crude fat. The top 5 ingredients are meat, ground oats, ground barley, ground rice, and maple syrup. Other ingredients are all natural and include a combination of fruits, vegetables, spices, and preservatives. These treats come in chewy, bite sized chunks about an inch long.

WHY WE LOVE: Zuke’s Power Bones are the prefect little treat for a day hike. We love giving tiny doses of energy (and love) to our dogs while out on the trail.

Amazon currently has an add-on special* on the beef flavor for $5.44 as of May 2018. That’s a really good price. Better take advantage of the awesome deal!!

Take me to Zuke’s Power Bones* now.

 

Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar

We look to hunters for advice on energy bars. The Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar* is new to us, but a staple for many hunting, sporting, and guard dogs. It’s compact and packaged for ultimate portability at any outdoor event, show, or during intense training exercises.

This 400g bar can be broken up into 8 smaller pieces. According to the manufacturer, 100-200g (2-4 small pieces) is enough for a 55 pound dog! That’s a small dose of energy! It will take about 30 minutes to 1.5 hours for the energy bar to take effect.
 

 

The Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar contains 25% crude protein and 59% crude fat. The top 5 ingredients are fish meal, lard, vegetable fat, grape sugar, and corn. Additional vitamins and minerals have been added to the bar.

A bonus in these treats is that these bars don’t freeze. You can use them in the winter without getting a hard block to give your dog! It’s also packaged so no need to package your own food.

This product is made by Henne Pet Food of Denmark and originally designed for dogsled teams.

WHY WE LOVE: This bar is one small, mighty compact dose of energy for your active dog!

As of May 2018, there is an extra 5% coupon*.

Take me to the Lakse Kronch Pemmikan Energy Bar* now.

 

Out Bar

The Out Bar is handcrafted in batches by The Great Outdogs. It’s a compact meal replacement for dogs that need a good boost of energy. The bar comes in three flavors; herring, lamb and turkey.

Each piece can be broken up into 4 smaller pieces. A 50 pound dog will need about 3.5 bars per day.

The Out Bar contains 23-28% crude protein and 16-23% crude fat. The top 5 ingredients are animal protein (herring, lamb / lamb liver, turkey / turkey liver), buckwheat flour, green lentils, sweet potatoes, and chickpeas. This may vary slightly based on flavor of the bar. Bars are grain-free, do not contain artificial preservatives, and have added vitamins and minerals. Ingredients are source from North America.

WHY WE LOVE: We love that this bar is handcrafted with quality ingredients.

Take me to the Out Bar now.

 

What energy bars do you get for your dog? For what activity?


Leave a comment if there are any other products you think are worth letting everyone know about! Please let us know why you like it, how you use the product, and how long you have been using it for.

 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


Join the Pawtivity Community. Meet Other Adventurers That Do What You Love To Do.
Sign up TODAY!

Activities: Shopping, Hiking, Camping, Backpacking, Great Outdoors, Running, Food, Biking, Sports – Water, Sports – Winter

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

Kootenai National Forest, MT

The Kootenai National Forest sits in Montana and Idaho. Scenic views will leave your breathless as you hike near cliffs, giant cedars, and large fields. The most popular areas in Kootenai are Cabinet Mountains Wilderness, Ten Lakes Scenic Area known for its carved glacier basins, Lake Koocanusa Scenic Byway, and Ross Creek Scenic Byway.

Dogs must be on leash or restrained in developed recreation areas. We recommend that dogs be well behaved and obey commands well as there are bears, wolves, and other wildlife that roam the area. Dogs are not allowed in swimming areas and on some beaches near water.

With over 1,400 miles of trails, there are a lot of options to consider! Some trails to consider: Ross Creek Cedar Area, Trout Creek National Recreation Trail at 19.8 miles, Kootenai Falls Trail, and Big Therriault Lake Loop Trail. In the summer only, head on to Little Spar Lake and take an 8 mile hike around the lake with your dog. Trails and maps can be found on the USDA website.

Mountain biking and road biking are allowed in the area. Check out mountain biking in the Libby area in the spring where there are over 132 different species of wildflowers. You’ll also want to head down the trails past Kootenai Falls. Check out the Sheldon Mountain bike course or Kootenai Trail.

There are several camping options in the area from standard campsites, to dispersed and RV camping. Most campsites are on a first-come, first-serve basis. Popular campgrounds to consider include Rexford Bench Campground, Loon Lake Campground, Big Therriault Lake Campground, or Timberland Campground. Spar Lake Campground has hiking, biking and a lake in the immediate area. Consider Yaak River Campground if you want to go road biking or be near the Kootenai River.

Large groups or families can consider McGillivray Campground. For cabins, go to Big Creek Baldy Lookout for a great view near Lake Koocanusa. Cabins and campgrounds are listed on the USDA website. Backpackers can refer to camping options here.

If you have a water dog or love fishing for salmon and trout, head over to the Lake Koocanusa area near Libby Dam. Large watercraft and sailing is allowed in the area. There are also campgrounds around the lake.

We hear there are morel mushrooms (non-toxic) in the area – but make sure your dog doesn’t eat a ton of them! Regular mushrooms are toxic to dogs. Some dogs love to hunt morel mushrooms, but you’ll need a permit to collect them.

For winter, go snowshoeing or cross-country skiing with your dog or consider cutting down your own christmas tree.


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Libby, MT | Lincoln County | Montana
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Biking, Tracking, NoseWork, Fishing, Swimming, Camping, Winter-Sports, Cross-Country Skiing, Snowshoeing, Social, Running

Best Travel Water Bowls and Bottles For Dogs (2018) – Pawtivity Picks

We love learning about the latest doggy stuff out there because we all want the best for our furry friends! Each week we cover the fun, novel, essential, and new products for dogs in our Pawtivity Picks Series.

This week we are covering portable travel water bowls for outdoor use. We are always on the hunt for something light and compact that’s easy to carry while we are out on an adventure with our dogs. Bowls must be durable, spill-proof, fast drying, easy to clean, and leak-proof for frequent use.

There are a few different types of portable water bowls and bottles. We break down these different types into the following categories: collapsible water bowls, pocket water bowls, no spill water bowls, and water bottles / pouches.

Products Covered: Collapsible Water Bowl, Foldable Water Bowl, Pocket Water Bowl, No Spill Water Bowl, Water Bottles, Water Pouch

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


COLLAPSIBLE WATER BOWLS

 

Collapsible water bowls are the most popular form of travel bowls because they are so easy to use and dry. You also don’t have to carry around a separate water bottle just for your dog, but you will need to carry around a larger supply of water. Here are some of our favorite collapsible water bowls.

Ruffwear Bivy Bowl

Ruffwear is a reputable manufacturer of quality, long-lasting and durable dog products. The Bivy Bowl* really lives up to the company’s reputation.

At just 2.96 ounces, you really can’t ask for another bowl to take with you when you are out on the go. The collapsible nature of the bowl makes it ultra-portable. Even more impressve is the fact the this bowl can hold 1.8 liters or about 60 ounces of water.

There’s a clip on the bowl to attach it to your bag to dry and store. The bottom of the bowl has no-slip rubber. An often overlooked feature is the reflective trim giving you an easier time to find your dog’s bowl in the dark.

One downside to the bowl is the high price. You also can’t pop the bowl into the dishwasher or washer to sanitize it. Ruffwear recommends that you hand wash the bowl instead.

WHY WE LOVE: It’s just one bowl for all your outdoor needs. Do you really want to carry around a clunky heavy bowl or have multiple bowls around? Durable, ultra-portable, and works for multiple dogs. One bowl to rule them all.

Take me to the Ruffwear Bivy Bowl* now.

Kurgo Collaps A Bowl

The Kurgo Collaps A Bowl* is made out of food-grade BPA free silicone. There’s a clip on the bowl that you can use to clip on to your bag. You can also fold and roll the bowl up easily to put into your dog’s backpack. Cleaning is easy with this bowl as you can sanitize the bowl in the dishwasher.

There’s a lot of silicone bowls on the market, but we love the design of this bowl the best and how much you can fill in the bowl. The bowl can carry 24 ounces of water, more than many other silicone bowls. Lips at the side of the bowl also make it easier to carry without getting your fingers wet or dirty.

Kurgo backs up their products with a lifetime warranty against manufacturing defects so you get the reassurance that you are getting a quality, well-made product to last.

WHY WE LOVE: Lightweight and collapsible. There’s no need to air-dry this bowl. It’s so easy to wash and dry. It’s best for frequent use out on the trail.

Take me to the Kurgo Collaps A Bowl* now.

Outward Hound Port A Bowl

The Outward Hound Port A Bowl* is a low cost, basic collapsible dog bowl that folds flat onto itself. It also dries fast.

The bowl comes in two sizes. The small can hold up to 24 ounces while the large can hold up to 48 ounces. There is an integrated elastic loop on the bowl, but you’ll have to add your own clip if you want to attach it to something.

Many users have mentioned that the bowl is not very leakproof and gets damp quickly. This isn’t usually a problem for those that use the bowl just for a quick water break.

WHY WE LOVE: For the price, it’s still a great portable option that can be stuffed into your dog’ backpack or your own.

Take me to the Outward Hound Port A Bowl* now.


POCKET WATER BOWLS

 

Pocket water bowls are great for those that want to carry as little as possible. They are ultra- portable and perfect for those that can’t carry around a heavy load with them. These are bowls designed for backpackers, runners, bikers, and those who are constantly on the move. Here are a few great pocket bowl finds.

Rad Dog Collaspible Pocket Bowl

Rad Dog’s Collapsible Pocket Bowl* is probably the smallest, foldable dog bowl we have seen on the market – it fits in the palm of your hand! The bowl is also waterproof and extremely lightweight at less than 1 ounce. The bowl can carry up to 16 ounces of water. We think backpackers, runners, and bikers would love this bowl for their dogs!

While super small, it doesn’t have the most stable base. It’s also pretty easy to lose and not visible for evening or night camping use. You may just have to hold it up for your dog to drink or eat.

WHY WE LOVE: It’s so minimal and best for those that want to carry as little as possible. Who wants to run or bike with a bulky bowl in their pocket or flapping against their bag?

Take me to the Rad Dog’s Collapsible Pocket Bowl* now.

Tuff Mutt Canvas Dog Bowl

Tuff Mutt’s Canvas Dog Bowl* is another great pocket bowl. It’s folds into the size of a cell phone and can hold up to 48 ounces of water.

The bowl is ultra-durable and made out of canvas with a waterproof lining. It also dries and wipes up for easy cleaning. There’s a reflective trim for evening use of the bowl. A portable carrying case comes with the dog bowl for easy storage in your bag or your dog’s backpack.

Tuff Mutt covers this bowl with their lifetime warranty.

WHY WE LOVE: This is the perfect portable option for large dogs or multiple dogs. We also love it for camping.

Take me to the Tuff Mutt Canvas Dog Bowl* now.


NO SPILL WATER BOWLS

 

No spill water bowls are great for dogs that get water all over the place, for dog sports, use in the car, and for camping. How many times have you put a water bowl down only to get knocked over by your dog or your dog’s leash every time he walks past? Here are a few no spill water bowls that we love.

Dublin Dog Nomad Travel Bowl

Although this isn’t a completely spill proof water bowl, the Dublin Dog Nomad Travel Bowl* does have a water bowl and food bowl that is connected together so it’s harder for your dog to tip over. It’s also very portable, folding and zipping up into the size of a cd case.

This bowl holds about 37 ounces of water and 47 ounces of food, so it’s a great choice for a long hiking trip or for camping use. The fabric is made of reflective 3M for high visibility.

The only downside is that this bowl is harder to wash after use. It’s also not meant to hold standing water for perhaps more than a few hours, so it may not be the best to use on a long road trip.

A nice feature that we would like to see on the bowl is a cinch top that can be used to hold food as well as expandable sides that can still zip up to a larger size.

WHY WE LOVE: We would still take this with us camping in a heartbeat. It’s perfect for mealtime and is great to stuff into your backpack without it snagging or getting caught on anything else.

Take me to the Dublin Dog Nomad Travel Bowl* now.

Heininger Waterboy

The Heininger WaterBoy* isn’t compact by any means, but it’s still a great bowl to use in a moving car, boat or on a camping trip.

The bowl carries up to 3 quarts (96 ounces) of water and is BPA Free.

The bowl lays flat, but fresh water flows into the bowl when your dog drinks.

Some users have claimed that the product is not spill-proof when tipped completely over. Others have had problems getting water to flow into the bowl if not filled up at least halfway and so recommend the product for smaller dogs.

WHY WE LOVE: We would love to take this camping with us just to avoid having repeated spilled water from using an open water bowl. It’s also great for long road trips.

Take me to the Heininger Waterboy* now.

ZoeZ Dog Water Bowl

The ZoeZ Dog Water Bowl* is a spill proof bowl that also keeps water clean and debris-free.

The dog bowl features a cover with a hole in the center that when pressed, reveals water for your dog to drink. The bowl can hold 33.8 ounce of water and can be taken apart for easy washing in the dishwasher.

It may require some human intervention to bring in some water into the dog bowl as you have to press the cover to reveal water.

You may have to train your dog to use the bowl properly. The bowl can actually limit how much your dog drinks at a time, so it may not be suitable for very large dogs.

WHY WE LOVE: This is a great bowl if you have a dog that slurps a lot of water at a time and spills water everywhere. We also like that it can help keep water clean when used outside.

Take me to the ZoeZ Do Water Bowl* now.


WATER BOTTLES / POUCHES

 

If you are running or biking with your dog, you may want to bring as little as possible. It may make more sense for you to get a water bottle that can be used for both you and your dog, instead of two separate bottles.

Water pouches are the best if you want something slim to put in your own backpack or your dog’s backpack. They also make great secondary water sources that you can use to fill your main water bottle, then fold up for compact storage.

Platypus Platy 2.0L Bottle

The Platypus Platy 2 Liter Bottle* is a lightweight and flexible water bottle that can carry 2 liters or 70 ounces of water. It can fit in most dog backpacks.

The bottle weighs only 1.3 ounces and is BPA-free, BPS-free, and phthalate-free. Food-grade polyethylene liners prevents water from tasting like plastic.

The bottle can be rolled up when empty and can stand up when filled.

Keep in mind that this bottle does not come with insulation, so water may freeze in very cold weather. Some have minimized freezing by pouring boiled water into the bottle. The bottle is also not as durable as regular water bottles and won’t last nearly as long.

WHY WE LOVE: This is a great option for a dog backpack simply because it helps keep bulk to a minimum and make things lighter for your dog to carry. We like that we won’t get plastic tasting water.

Take me to the Playtpus Platy 2.0 Bottle* now.

Baiji Bottle

If you want a bottle that’s a bit more durable, consider the Baiji Bottle* which holds 20 ounces of water.

This bottle is made of food grade silicone, BPA-free, and completely rollable or foldable when empty.

A clip on the bottle is useful for attaching to your bag.

We wish this bottle could carry more water, but it’s slim enough to carry two in our bags without a problem.

Each order on Amazon comes with 2 bottles.

WHY WE LOVE: No more plastic bottles or heavy bottles. If you like the feel of a bottle, but want something light and collapsible this is a great option for any travel use.

Take me to the Baiji Bottle* now.

H2O4K9 Dog Water Bottle

Want to get a bottle just for your dog and avoid carrying around an extra bowl? Consider the H2O49 Dog Water Bottle* made of food grade stainless steel and BPA-free plastic lid.

The main feature on this bottle is its twist top lid which can be used as a dog bowl for a quick drink. The bottle holds 25 ounces of water and is completely leak-proof.

A clip loop is included, but you’ll have to attach your own clip to it. The bottle is dishwasher safe.

Even though this bottle is steel, it’s not insulated so it won’t keep water cold.

WHY WE LOVE: Well, the dogs just love lapping water from the lid and many prefer it to bowls that are placed on the ground. Dog approved – how can we argue with that? It’s also very pretty!

Take me to the H2O4K9 Dog Water Bottle* now.

 


Leave a comment if there are any other products you think are worth letting everyone know about! Please let us know why you like it, how you use the product, and how long you have been using it for.

 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


Join the Pawtivity Community. Meet Other Adventurers That Do What You Love To Do.
Sign up TODAY!

Activities: Shopping, Hiking, Biking, Running, Camping, Great Outdoors

Amazon Affiliate Disclosure: The owner of Pawtivity is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for us to earn fees by linking to Amazon.com and affiliated sites.  

Winter Paw Care And Treatment

Winter Paw Care and Treatment For The Outdoor Dog

If you and your dog love to go outside, winter paw care is essential.

Dogs need paw protection from snow and ice as well as from any chemicals that are used on snow or ice.

We give you the essentials to prevent dog paw injuries and as well as basic paw treatment tips you can use when you are out on an adventure with your dog.
This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with winter paw tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


PREVENTIVE CARE & GROOMING

 

A little grooming goes a long way to preventing paw pad injury and pain.

Trim the fur on your dog between the toes so that the fur is even with the surface of your dog’s paw pads. Otherwise, snow and ice and can pack up between the paw pads making it painful for your dog to walk. You will also want to make sure your dog’s nails are trimmed.

Dogs should have long body hair trimmed (not shaved). Ice and chemicals can get stuck on long hair and dry out your dog’s skin. Worse, it can cause a bad irritation or rash.

When you bathe your dog, use an extra moisture-rich shampoo and lukewarm water. Some follow up by massaging coconut oil into their dog’s skin to moisturize and prevent flakes.

Mushers Secret* (paw wax), Bag Balm* (paw balm), or Vaseline can be used on a daily basis to keep your dog’s paws well-conditioned. They will help prevent chapping and cuts due to cold weather. Apply a very thin layer as you don’t need a lot.

As always, make sure your dog is updated on his vaccines and ask your vet about any precautions you need to take with your dog and specific treatment necessary for your dog.


OUTDOOR DOG PAW PROTECTION

 

For some outdoor dog paw protection, invest in waterproof boots or use a wax to help prevent buildup of snow and ice between your dog’s toes. You will also want paw protection to guard against chemicals and salt that may be on the ground and that may be toxic to your dog. An easy way to keep your dog’s paws clean is to have them walk on grass when they are outside where chemicals and deicers are not used.

Boots provide the best traction and protect against sharp ice, rock and slippery surfaces. Find boots with a velcro strap or something similar to keep the boot snug around your dog’s ankle but not too tight. Dogs need to practice walking in boots, so have them wear them inside the house and give them a lot of treats! When your dog gets a bit more comfortable, go on a walk around your house and work yourself up to a hike.


FIRST AID ITEMS TO PACK

 

The below is our recommended list for a basic first aid kid that you can bring for you and your dog on any outdoor adventure. These are useful to treat paw injuries and more.

  • Towel or Wipes
  • Absorbent Dressing or Wound Pad
  • Gauze Bandage
  • Medical Tape
  • Small Bandages for Humans
  • Tongue Depressors
  • Gloves
  • Antibiotic Ointment for Humans and Dogs
  • Paw Wax or Paw Balm
  • Tweezers
  • Tick Remover
  • Comb
  • Scissors
  • Ziplock bag (multiple uses, including making an ice pack)
  • Warm Water Bottle and Cup
  • Lightweight Insulated Blanket
  • Extra Leash (can be combined with blanket as an emergency shelter)
  • First Aid Cheat Sheet
  • Nearest Open Emergency Vet Location
  • Your Vet’s Contact and Medical Records

Going out into wet weather? Look also at our list additional first aid items to prevent and treat blisters, read: Tips for Hiking In The Rain: Staying Dry to Paw / Foot Care.

For more information about what to pack for a winter outing, read: Top 10 Safety Tips for Winter Hiking With Your Dog – Comprehensive Guide.


ON YOUR ADVENTURE

 

When you are out on a hike or winter adventure, it’s a good idea to check your dog’s paw pads periodically. Remove any snow or ice that has collected between their paw pads and check for harmful debris or bloody paws. Be aware that dogs can get ticks or cuts between their toes.

Make sure you also have enough water with you. For a moderate 1 hour hike, bring about 32 oz. of water for yourself and about an ounce of water more per pound weight for your dog. If your dog is 32 pounds, bring at least 64 ounces of water for you and your dog. How much water you need really does depend on what you do and how long you go, but take short frequent water breaks. For winter, bring a bottle filled with warm water with a wide-mouth so your water does not freeze.


PAW INJURIES AND TREATMENT

 

There are several injuries you can watch for while you are out with your dog. We provide some basic treatments that you can apply if your dog has a paw injury outside.

Please note that we are not a certified vet, so any recommendations listed are only suggestions that you may do for your pet. Please consult your vet for more information.

Raw or Torn Paw Pads

This is the most common dog paw injury that can happen any time of the year. Become familiar to what your dog’s paw pads look like while healthy. If they are raw, they may appear red or skin may be peeling off. Clean the paw and remove any debris and loose skin. Apply ointment and wrap your dog’s paw with a bandage. Call your vet to see if you need to take your dog in. Your dog may need to sit out on a few hikes to let his pads heal. When you are at home, put a baby sock on your dog so he doesn’t try to lick his paws. You will need something that can breathe and that’s not too tight. You can also purchase specially made bandages that make it difficult for dogs to bite and have a lick deterrent taste.

Bloody Paws or Pus

Wash your dog’s paw and inspect for any injury. Remove any debris that may be the cause of the injury. To stop bleeding, apply pressure on the area until the bleeding stops. Then, follow up by applying balm or wax on your dog’s paws. If the bleeding does not stop, wrap a bandage with gauze over the wound and call your vet immediately or go to an emergency vet. Change the bandage as soon as it gets soaked with blood. If you see pus or bleeding from a broken nail, call a vet to find out what you can do. You don’t want to bring on more infection to the area.

Frostbite

If your dog’s paws, tails, or ears have ice on them this is a pretty good indication that they are on their way to getting frostbite. They may also have discoloration in their skin. Severe cases of frostbite occur when the skin turns black. If you suspect that your dog has frostbite, wrap them up in a blanket and call your vet. You will want to head back as soon as possible.

Bite Wound

If your dog gets a bite wound while you are out, hopefully you got a glimpse of what bit your dog. Tie your dog to a tree with your leash. It may be necessary to muzzle your dog if he is not cooperating after being attacked. If you don’t have a muzzle you can use strips of cloth or bandage as a makeshift muzzle. Calm your dog down and carefully wash the wound to inspect the damage. You can use a comb or scissors to pull back and cut any hair around the wound.

If the bite wound is bleeding, apply pressure to the area until bleeding stops. If the bleeding does not stop, wrap a bandage with gauze over the wound and call your vet immediately or go to an emergency vet. Change the bandage as soon as it gets soaked with blood.

Limping, Licking, Inflammation

If your dog is limping, licking his paws, or his paws are inflamed call your vet. To give your dog some immediately relief, wash his paws and remove any debris. Inspect the area to find the source of the injury. Treat any swelling with an ice pack. If you suspect chemicals to be the cause of inflammation or burned paws, apply an antibiotic ointment made for dogs. If you suspect a broken bone, do the best you can to create a splint with tongue depressors or sticks and bandage. If you can manage it, carry your dog to the car and go to an emergency vet.
For more information about other signs to watch out for in your dog, read: Top 10 Safety Tips for Winter Hiking With Your Dog – Comprehensive Guide.


AFTER YOUR ADVENTURE

 

Towel-dry your dog’s paws when you get into the car or wipe them down with some doggy wipes. This will at least minimize your dog from trying to lick their paws clean. If your dog was wearing boots, simply remove the boots before your dog gets in the car.

When you get home from a hike, wash your dog’s paws. You can either dip your dog’s paws in a cup of warm water when get home or use a spray bottle to remove debris. Follow up with a good towel drying and let them loose inside. If you leave any chemicals or salt on your dog’s paws your dog may ingest them by licking them clean or they may actually burn your dog’s paws causing more injury and a temporary end to your outings. Paw injuries take longer to heal.

To keep your dog’s paws well conditioned, apply a very thin layer of paw wax, like Musher’s Secret*, or moisturizer to protect your dog’s paw pads from getting too dry. You don’t need a lot on your dog’s paws to condition them if you do this daily.

 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!

 


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Activities: Hiking, Backpacking, Camping, Running, Outdoor Play, Winter – Sports, Great Outdoors, Walking

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Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, WA

Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest, WA

The Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest covers about 4 million acres of the eastern slope of the Cascade Range. The national forest is managed by 7 different ranger districts: Chelan Ranger District, Cle Elum Ranger District, Entiat Ranger District, Methow Valley Ranger District, Naches Ranger District, Tonasket Ranger District, and Wenatchee River Ranger District.

Check conditions before you head out. In general, the USDA requires dogs to be on a 6 ft leash in designated wilderness areas and in developed recreation areas. Dogs are not allowed in public swimming areas. We advise asking a ranger for the specific area that you are hiking if you have any doubts. You will need a pass to use the park.

There are so many trails within the Okanogan-Wenatchee National Forest. Dogs are not allowed at the Enchantments, Snow Lakes, Colchuck Lake, Stuart Lake, Eightmile Lake and Ingall’s Lake. According to the USDA, dogs may be off leash but under control at al times on trail, but must be leashed in wilderness areas.

A few great dog-friendly trails include: Driveway Butte, Icicle Gorge Trail (dogs leashed), Icicle Ridge Trail, Rachel Lake Trail, Lake Ann/Maple Pass Loop Trail for a more challenging hike, and Gold Creek Trail for an easy hike.

In the summer, the Echo Nordic Ski Area is open for hiking and biking. Trails will be wide in this area. Maps are available for summer hiking.

With over 150 campgrounds in the national forest, the options for camping are endless. Most sites are on a first come, first serve basis. Larger group sites may be reserved in advance. There is a 14 day stay limit. Dogs must be leashed at campsites.

Biking is allowed on many trails. Popular mountain biking areas include Devils Gulch, lower Chiwawa Valley areas (Wenatchee River Ranger District), Mad Lake and Lake Creek (Entiat Ranger District), Devils Backbone, and Echo Ridge areas (Chelan Ranger District. More information on winter biking and fat tire biking can be found here.

For those that love winter sports, Echo Ridge Nordic Ski Area (Chelan Ranger District) offers 25 miles of groomed trails and great scenic views of the Enchantments, Pyramid Peak, and Okanogan Highlands. Dogs are allowed on these trails: The Tootsy Roll, Whoop-Di-Do, Lolly Pop, Zoom, and Outback ski trails. All snowshoe trails are also open to dogs. A map of winter trails is available with a nice indicator for which trails are dog friendly (we love that!).


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Location: Wenatchee, WA | Chelan, WA | Cle Elum, WA | Entiat, WA | Winthrop, WA | Naches, WA | Tonasket, WA | Leavenworth, WA | Chelan County | Kittitas County | Okanogan County | Yakima County | Cascade Mountains | Washington
Activities: Hiking, Walking, Camping, Biking, Snowshoeing, Cross-Country Skiing, Winter – Sports, Sightseeing

Top 10 Safety Tips: Winter Hiking With Your Dog – Comprehensive Guide

There are always more safety precautions to take when doing sports or hiking with your dog in the winter time. Here is the only comprehensive guide you need for cold weather, winter safety and winter hiking with your dog.

As always, make sure your dog is updated on his vaccinations and healthy enough to go hiking before heading out. Consult your vet to make sure your dog can be outside for a long hike. Remember, puppies and older dogs can’t always regulate their temperatures well.

We do update our guides periodically, so please save this article and refer back to it when you need to. We also update articles with the latest and greatest picks of best products or links to other guides that may help you.

This article contains affiliate links. We may earn a small commission (at no cost to you) for our endorsement, recommendation, testimonial, and/or link to any products or services marked with an *. The main purpose of this article is to provide you with hiking and safety tips. We will only provide links to truly great products we think our visitors would appreciate learning more about.


 

TOP 10 SAFETY TIPS FOR WINTER HIKING WITH YOUR DOG – COMPREHENSIVE GUIDE

 

1 Choose Dog Friendly Trail Carefully

To start with, you should pick a trail that is dog friendly. Snow should be pretty well packed down and at least a depth your dog will be comfortable walking through. Your dog will be exerting too much energy if they have to wade through thick, fluffy snow and prone to exhaustion quickly. Mushy snow or very wet, cold conditions don’t make the most comfortable hike for you or your dog. Stay indoors if it is sleeting, hailing, or there are severe thunderstorms in the forecast.

Plan to go a distance you and your dog are already comfortable with. Now is not the time to challenge yourself by going faster or longer. Winter conditions make snow hiking and winter hiking more difficult and colder! You may want to limit your hikes to anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour. If you go longer than that, try to break your trip up and find a place to stop and warm up before heading out again.

Hunting season occurs during the fall and winter. If you are hiking where hunting is allowed, put an orange reflective vest* or orange bandana on your dog so that they are more visible. You might need something else for yourself if you have a dark coat.

Sometimes, even when you plan out going somewhere conditions just are not what they seem to be. Have a backup plan in place if you can’t hike in your chosen trail. It’s always a good idea to pack some toys in the car and perhaps a long leash to get some playtime in with your dog if you can’t go hiking.

If you do night hiking, make sure you choose a wide, well-marked trail and go with a human buddy and bring a communication device. You should also bring proper lighting, including adding an LED dog collar* on your dog that you can slip on over your dog’s existing collar when needed.

Of course, you can use Pawtivity’s search banner to find the best dog friendly trails by location (city, state), destination, or activity with all the information you need to get the door fast with your dog.

 

2 Have Good Recall

Having good recall on your dog is always a good safety measure in any situation. Train your dog to follow verbal and even non-verbal cues to come back to you. It may also be smart to train your dog to come back to you at the sound of a specific whistle. While dogs do have great hearing, whistles* are a life saver if your dog goes off at distances of greater than 200 yards which is the distance of about half a lap on a track. You’ll be glad to have a good whistle if you get lost, especially if the whistle is audible to both humans and dogs and can cut through other noise.

To make it easier to see your dog, dress him up in bright colors that you can spot at a distance. Some great colors are orange, green, pink, or red. You can always pack a bandana in your first aid kit put on your dog when you need it.

You may need to train your dog to also not react to distractions such as other hikers, runners, skiers, bikers, snowboarders, or snowmobiles depending on where you go. It’s best if your dog knows commands such as “leave it”, “stay”, and “sit” among others and practice impulse control. It may help just to allow your dog to sniff items they are likely to encounter on your hike.

 

3 Stay Warm and Dry

Huskies love the cold weather but not all dogs have a thick double coat or long hair to give them protection. If your dog has a single coat and short hair, they will need to wear a coat outside to keep them warm. Never shave your dog in winter, instead trim their hair.

Protect your dog in cold weather. Most dogs will need some type of insulated coat to stay warm in cold temperatures. We like coats that cover the belly and allow for easy access to your dog’s collar or harness. Coats can either come with an insulating layer* or you can get a separate fleece lining* or waterproof shell* for your dog to layer together. We like the versatility of having a separate insulating layer from the outer coat so you can use one layer without the other, if needed. If you get hot, you can always take a layer off.

The best fabrics for winter will be those that are waterproof, insulating, and that dry quickly. Wool, fleece and synthetic fabrics are great choices of fabric. Consider layering with a base layer, an insulating layer, and an outer waterproof layer. You’ll ultimately need to experiment around to find out what layers work the best for you and your dog. It greatly depends on many factors including your activity level. If your dog gets wet, dry them off with a towel or change them into dry clothing.

Stay away from cotton. As soon as cotton gets wet, it pretty much stays wet leaving you and your dog prone to hyperthermia and avoidable misery.

If you use boots on your dog, make sure that you get boots that are completely waterproof and ones with some sort of velcro or strap to help keep the boot on and water or snow out.

 

4 Pack Smart

Cold weather requires that you bring more than you typically would need on a warm season hike. You’ll be carrying more weight than normal, so you will want to park smart. This means choosing items that are lightweight but effective, like you are going backpacking. You don’t want to be weighed down carrying extra items.

If your dog is not a “winter” dog and needs to bundle up in a bunch of gear, you may want to leave the dog backpack at home or give them less to carry. Don’t stress them out or have them exert more energy than they need.

Don’t forget that cold conditions may make your food or treats turn hard. If you are tired and hungry, you want something edible and satisfying! Bring items that stay soft when it’s cold. You can always try to put your food in the refrigerator or freezer for a short period of time to see how it turns your food or treats.

 

5 Pack with Safety In Mind

The most important thing to pack is water. Don’t rely on your dog to start panting as a cue to when they need water. Offer water to your dog frequently and let them sip a little at a time to prevent bloating, water intoxication, and cramping. The same rule applies to you. Ensure proper hydration by drinking water before your hike.

How much water you bring depends on where you go, what you do, and how long you hike. As a general rule for a moderate 1 hour hike, plan to bring 32 oz. of water for yourself and more for your dog. Considering that a dog needs about an ounce of water per pound weight, a 30 pound dog would need about the same amount as you. It never hurts to bring more water than you need.

A very important, but often overlooked consideration is what type of water bottle* to bring. If you are hiking in below freezing temperatures, your water may freeze. Choose a bottle or water bladder with a wide-mouth and fill it with warm water. To keep water from freezing when you are outside, keep it close to your body. If you need to stop for an extended period of time, you can actually bury your water bottle and use the snow as an insulator. We don’t really recommend water bladders in freezing temperatures. The right water bottle is much more reliable.

The second most important thing to pack is a first aid kit. We consider the essentials for hiking year-round to include: first aid cheat sheet, gauze, bandages, tape, ice pack or ziplock bag you can throw snow in, tweezers or tick remover, antibiotic ointment for humans and dogs, alcohol wipes, gloves, scissors, tongue depressor, wax paw protection, comb, extra leash, rag or disposable pet wipes, and the nearest open vet phone number. We have yet to find a compact essentials first aid kit for humans and dogs that we love. There are many kits out there, but they are bulky in our opinion if you need just the essentials. Pack your own essentials.

Depending on where you go, you may also want to bring some survival gear with you. For the winter, additional items you may need include: extra clothing, towel, lightweight insulated blanket*, waterproof insulated mat* that is puncture proof, fire-building tools, lighting, whistle*, extra water and food, emergency shelter*, collapsible bowl, signaling device, ice axe*, bright bandana and paracord. We actually were blown away by this all-in-one first aid kit* perfect for any emergency. You’ll still have to pack up dog-specific items, food and water, but they do give you tools to go fishing! Links provided with an * are affiliate links but we wouldn’t recommend them unless we really thought they were a top-notch safety item. We have picked out some of the best of the best compact choices for you.

If you are hiking at high altitudes or out a lot in snow, over time it may cause some damage to your dog’s eyes. They will also need to be alert and see well, especially if you are running, skiing, snowboarding, or biking with your dog. Rex Specs* makes a pair of goggles that may help your dog’s eyes.

Need some hiking survival tips? Consider getting a book to read up on skills that may one day save your life. Some books you may consider include: 1) Bushcraft 101: A Field Guide to the Art of Wilderness Survival* and 2) Survival Hacks: Over 200 Ways to Use Everyday Items for Wilderness Survival*.

 

6 Protecting Dog Paws In Winter

To protect your dog’s paws, invest in some great waterproof boots or use a wax to help prevent buildup of snow and ice between your dog’s toes. You will also want paw protection to guard against chemicals and salt that may be on the ground and that may be toxic to your dog.

If you are putting your dog in boots, have them wear them inside the house first so that they get used to walking in them. Give them some treats and praise so they associate the boots with a reward. Then, go for a few trips around the neighborhood and give them some more treats. Pretty soon, they may be going to their boots rather than their leash when you tell them it’s time to go out on a hike!

Trim fuzz between the paw pads so that it is even with the surface of their paw. Otherwise, it’s easy for snow and ice to get packed up between the paw pads which is actually painful for a dog. When you are out on a hike, periodically remove any snow and ice between your dog’s paw pads and check for bloody paws.

When you get home from a hike, wash your dog’s paws. You can either dip your dog’s paws in a cup of warm water or use a spray bottle to remove debris. Follow up with a good towel drying and a thin layer of wax or moisturizer like Mushers Secret* to protect to keep their paw pads from getting too dry. We absolutely love Musher’s Secret for any dog, but especially if your dog just can’t get used to booties.

Going out into wet weather? Look also at our list additional first aid items to prevent and treat blisters, read: Tips for Hiking In The Rain: Staying Dry to Paw / Foot Care.

 

7 Steer Clear of Ice

Stay clear of water sources and any shiny areas that may be ice. Dogs can slip just as easily as humans. If your dog is off-leash, call them back if they get too close to a water source. Even if one portion of the lake seems to be solid, it may not be consistently solid throughout. It’s probably best to leave your dog on leash when there is frozen water nearby.

If you do find yourself in a situation where you dog has gone under a partially-frozen lake, call for help immediately. Wait until help arrives and remember the path where your dog entered the water. It may give a clue to rescuers on which way to go to save your dog. When your dog is out of the water, follow instructions given you by rescuers and keep your dog warm. Call your vet for more instructions.

If your dog is within arms-reach of you and in shallow water, make sure you have a strong footing on solid ground or someone who can hold you back. Do not touch the water or ice. Throw your dog something long and soft that he can bite, like your waterproof mat, and pull him to shore. Keep him warm and call your vet. We are not a certified veterinarian or safety specialist so you may ultimately consult an expert for information on what to do in an emergency situation.

 

8 Take Time To Savor Winter Beauty And Play

You’ve done a lot of preparation for a winter hike, so don’t forget to enjoy the serene beauty that comes with a winter landscape. When you are taking a break, soak in how great it is to be out with your dog enjoying nature. Take some time to have some fun and play in the snow with your dog.

Some activities that you can do with your dog include: Snow Diving, Build a Snowdog, or play Snowball Catch.

Don’t forget to capture some photos of your dog! Sign up for an account on Pawtivity so you can categorize all of your special moments with your dog by what you do and where you go.

 

9 Signs To Watch Out For

Please note that we are not a certified vet, so any recommendations listed are only suggestions that you may do for your pet. Please consult your vet for more information.

Bloody Paws – Wash your dog’s paw and inspect for any injury. Remove any debris that may be the cause of the injury. Follow up by applying balm or wax on your dog’s paws. To stop bleeding, apply pressure on the area and follow up with a call to your vet to see if you need to have your dog looked at. You can also wrap your dog’s paw in a bandage if you are still out hiking.

Refusal To Walk, Whining – Your dog may just be telling you that he wants to go home. Listen to your dog. It’s not worth it to have to carry him home if he just doesn’t want to be outside.

Slight Shivering – Your dog needs extra warmth or warm water. Add an insulated layer to your dog’s coat. Lay out a mat and cover your dog in an insulated blanket. Give him some warm water and food. Rest up and warm up before you continue your hike. Otherwise, it may be time to head home.

Lagging Behind – Chances are there is something wrong with your dog. Check your dog’s paws and give your dog water to avoid exhaustion or dehydration. Rest up and slowly go back to your car.

Constant Shivering, Dilated Pupils, Slow and Irregular Breathing, Stiff Muscles, Pale Gums – Stop immediately, rest, and keep your dog warm. Your dog may be getting hypothermia. If symptoms are severe, you may have to wrap them in a blanket and carry them back to the car and see the vet as soon as possible.

Dry Nose and Mouth, Poor Skin Elasticity, Discolored Gums, Lethargy – Your dog may be dehydrated. Giving your dog more water may make them vomit. You could try to give him some ice instead. Consult your vet immediately.

Discoloration of Any Body Parts, Waxy Skin, Blisters – This may be a sign of frostbite. You will want to wrap your dog in a blanket and head home immediately. When you get home, warm the area with wrapped hot water bottles or warm towels. Call your vet for more information on what to do next.

 

10 Winter Dog Care At Home

With winter also comes dry, itchy skin. Keeping your house well humidified during the winter. Coconut oil is a natural way to moisturize your dog’s paws and skin. Various salves are also on the market to help sooth dryness. If your dog has really dry skin, consult your vet. You may also need give your dog less frequent baths, change your shampoo, or make sure the water is not so hot.

Mushers Secret*, or another similar balm can be used on a daily basis to keep your dog’s paws well-conditioned.

Make sure that your dog is sleeping in a warm area in your house and has proper bedding. You can also give your dog a blanket to snuggle in.

Dogs need to eat more when it’s cold outside to stay warm. Your dog should always have access to fresh water at all times – inside or outside.

 

Is there a great dog-friendly activity or event missing from our list? Contact us so we can share it with the community!


Join the Pawtivity Community. Meet Other Adventurers That Do What You Love To Do.
Sign up TODAY!

Related Pawtivity / Event: Hiking
Activities: Hiking, Backpacking, Camping, Skiing, Snowboarding, Biking, Winter – Sports

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Cross Country Skiing With Your Dog

Go Cross Country Skiing

Cross Country Skiing is an easy sport to get into with your dog, given that you already have all the equipment and know how to ski. Additional equipment that you may need includes a hands free leash. Skijoring is a related activity that involves having your dog or multiple dogs pull you in front.

Great trails are often found at resorts, nordic centers or large state parks, but make sure you find out their policies on dogs before you go. You should have at least 4-6 inches of packed snow. Make sure your dog is tall enough that he can run through the snow comfortably. Running in snow is a lot more demanding so train slowly to build up you and your dog’s stamina and endurance.


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Activities: Cross-Country Skiing, Skiing, Snow Fun

Go Dog Sledding With Your Dog

Do you love watching the Iditarod or want to learn what it takes to drive a dog sled or even train a dog sled dog?

The best way to learn is by example. It may not be wise to invest a lot of money into this sport right away – what if your dog hates it?? Before you actually try dog sledding, it may also be a good idea to start your dog training in bikejoring, skijoring, canicross or a similar sport where your dog is involved in pulling your forward. Canicross is probably the easiest to start with and you can implement dog sledding commands when you are out running.

Fun Dog Sled Commands: These are some fun commands you can start teaching your dog. You don’t have to use these commands, of course. Use what makes sense to you and your dog!

Go / Hike / Mush / Let’s Go = Go Forward
Right / Gee = Turn Right
Left / Haw = Turn Left
Come Gee or Come Haw = Make a 180 Degree Turn Right Or Left
Easy / Wait = Slow Down
Stop / Whoa / Stay = Stop
Leave It / On By = Keep Going, Ignore Distractions
Trail = Request Right Of Way On A Trail
More Commands

Find a group that is going out dog sledding with their dogs and ask questions. To learn more from the insiders, why not volunteer at the next Iditarod or another dog sledding event? It will give you a great chance to talk to people and learn first hand how to get started in this dog sport. There is a lot of training involved for both you and your dog, even if you are doing recreational dog sledding.

Did you go dog sledding? How do you plan to teach your dog to go dog sledding? Take a photo of your dog!


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Activities: Dog Sledding, Mushing, Snow

Go Skijoring with Your Dog

Go Skijoring

Skijoring is a sport that where dogs pull a cross-country skiier. Dogs are harnessed to their owner and the owner uses poles to help push forward. This sport is reserved for stronger dogs who can pull your weight. Dogs should be at least 30 pounds.

SkijorUSA provides more information about gettings started with skijoring. If it’s not snowing, consider going bikejoring or running with your dog!

Do you go skijoring with your dog? How did you get started? Any tips for new dog owners who want to start out? Take a photo of your dog skjoring!


 

Help a fellow dog owner! Do you have an adventure story? Contact us and we will link it to this pawtivity or event! Where did you go? What did you do? Please include any useful tips and advice that would help others!

Activities: Skijoring, Skiing, Canicross